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Myron Mixon on the Worst Barbecue He’s Ever Eaten

Myron Mixon on the Worst Barbecue He’s Ever Eaten


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Chef Myron Mixon is a true barbecue legend. Not only is he a three-time world BBQ champion, he’s also the head judge on Destination America’s BBQ Pitmasters (which will be premiering its fourth season Sunday, June 2, at 9 p.m.), a best-selling author, and the restaurateur behind two restaurants called Pride and Joy, one in Miami and the other opening soon in New York City.

We had the opportunity to speak with Mixon about the upcoming season, as well as what makes barbecue great, the worst barbecue he’s ever had, and the challenges of opening a barbecue restaurant in the middle of Manhattan.

The new season of BBQ Pitmasters will be different from the previous ones thanks to a new influx of guest judges, who will be filling the third judge slot. The biggest name is probably Chris Lilly, but there will also be "some pretty high-profile BBQ personalities," according to Mixon, and at the end of the season they’ll be selecting one of them for a permanent judging role. "You’ll be pretty surprised but pretty happy with who we select," he added. The season’s grand champion will go on to win $50,000.

As for common misconceptions about the competitive barbecue circuit, there’s one main difference: "It’s very meticulous," he said. "You can only take a couple bites and then we gotta move on and judge the next entry. So that competitor’s gotta get so much flavor, that wow factor, in a couple of bites."

As for the hallmarks of great barbecue, it’s fairly simple: "It’s about the correct amount of smoke that you can get on a piece of meat, the tenderness achieved, and at the end of the day it’s about the flavor that you impart into that meat," he said.

When it’s your job to eat barbecue, you eat a lot of good and a lot of bad. And Mixon’s eaten some bad barbecue. "[The] worst barbecue I’ve ever had was some overcooked brisket that was almost charred and oversmoked to the point where I thought I had a forest fire in my mouth," he said. "The worst mistake you see happening is that the meat is overcooked. Even overcooked to the point where they’ve got it too hot and the outside is charred and the inside is underdone."

The most important rule of BBQ? Know your smoker. "You need to practice on it, you need to learn how it works," he said.

Mixon’s newest restaurant, Pride and Joy, will be opening sometime in June in New York City’s Lower East Side. Opening a restaurant in New York certainly presented some unique challenges. Finding the right space was one of them, but they conquered that one: it’s a 10,000-square-foot space in a prime location, and they "really fixed that place up to where even before you eat the food, it looks barbecue, and that’s what I tried to achieve," he said.

For Mixon, deciding on New York was a no-brainer. "We decided that we wanted to hit some big markets, with a lot of people who really appreciate good food in general, not just barbecue," he said. "New York tops that list. We really weren’t planning New York this quickly, but the property became available in the place that we really wanted to be. And it just came together, and that’s when we pulled the trigger on it and started working hard to get it done."

Nowadays there’s no major shortage of solid barbecue in New York, but Mixon believes that there’s still a niche for him to fill. "I’ve learned it, and I’ve learned it well," he said. "And I’m bringing those recipes that helped me become a three-time world champion and we’re using those same recipes in the restaurant in New York. So you’re going to get some barbecue that I think is going to be totally different from anything else that anybody’s eaten here in the city."


BBQ Guru Myron Mixon On Why ‘Barbecue Is The Backbone Of America’

If barbecue is the backbone of America, then we would like to roast America on a spit and smother it in condiments. BBQ Pitmasters star and judge Myron Mixon spared some time to chat with us about America’s greatest culinary tradition, while gearing up for the Big Apple Barbecue this weekend in New York. From his most meaningful accolade out of a head-spinning number of championship titles, to his weakness for Art Smith‘s fried chicken, to a fascinating history lesson on BBQ in the 1700s, Myron is a wealth of vinegary knowledge that had us salivating for the upcoming weekend’s festivities. Check out our interview with him and see what Myron can teach you about Q!

Who’s your BBQ or culinary icon?
You know, I do get to meet a lot of I guess you could call them “celebrity chefs,” and I admire every one of them. But as far as barbecue icons, it would probably be some folks that you wouldn’t recognize. First and foremost would be my dad Jack Nixon, who my company’s named for, Jack’s Old South. But the guy or the gentleman that really set the bar for me, especially when I started competing back in 1996 was Pat Burke from Murphysboro, Illinois.

I know you’re familiar with Blue Smoke and maybe you even know the name Mike Mills, who consulted with Danny Meyer when they built Blue Smoke and everything. Well, Pat Burke was the other half of Mike Mills’ competition team back in the day — the Apple City Cook Team out of Murphysboro, Illinois. And Pat Burke and I got to be close friends because I was basically chasing him. He was the man to beat. He was the man that I chased trying to become the man. Pat right now is like, 73 years old. He just retired this year from competitive barbecue. He didn’t teach me how to barbecue — my dad did — but Pat Burke taught me how to be a champion, and I really love him for that.

Who or what restaurant served up your favorite meal?
We’ll talk about barbecue. The barbecue that stands out for me the most, besides what we cooked and my family cooked is Fincher’s Barbecue. It’s in Macon, Georgia, about 30 miles north of where I live. It’s been there since 1927. And this is barbecue that my dad, before he really started barbecuing commercially, his dad took him to, and my dad took me to it, and my wife when she was pregnant craved this barbecue.

If you could have any chef in the world cook for you, who would it be?
Now as far as restaurants overall, it would probably be fried chicken by Art Smith. I love Art Smith’s fried chicken. You know, he’s got a restaurant in DC, Art and Soul, and I love fried chicken everywhere I go. That’s one of my weaknesses, if you want to call it, and Art Smith cooks probably the best fried chicken I have ever eaten.

I would have Art cooking me fried chicken and red velvet cake. I love red velvet cake. He does that well also.

If you could cook for anyone in the world, who would it be?
I’ll tell you who I would love to cook for and he’s a South Georgian. Ted Turner! I would love to cook for that guy. Because he’s big on the outdoors. He’s got that buffalo burger thing going on with his buffalo herds he’s doing. He’s kind of outspoken, kind of like me, and no-holds-barred, and I like the guy.

To what do you attribute your “celebrity chef” status, if you do, in fact, think of yourself as one?
I think it was probably by the sheer numbers of wins I’ve had in competitions. I’ve won more than anybody else ever has in competition. But with that being said, competitions aren’t the only thing that people can gauge you by. You’ve got to be approachable. You’ve got to be able to — for short of a term — be able to speak. Be able to present your ideas about what you’re doing, in my case, barbecuing, and making people understand it.

And I’m not saying there’s not better barbecue folks out there. But you’ve got to make the masses understand what you’re trying to convey to them about this meal, about this food, and about how good it is, how easy it is to get done and prepare. And I don’t know if I’ve got that or not, but I think I do. And I think I get that from my grandmother and my mother, because they used to do a lot of cooking for the churches and stuff, and they’d get together and they’d pass recipes around and that’s what they would do. They didn’t have them written down, they’d have them in memory. So you had to be able to express yourself and get those recipes out by word of mouth only.

Imagine you’re teaching BBQ for Dummies: what are the basic must-dos and/or steps to follow?
I don’t think anybody’s dumb that’s doing barbecue. I’m glad they’re doing it. A lot of times the misconception that happens with barbecue is people try to make it something it’s not. Barbecue is a very simple food, and you need to take it from that approach. And it’s not something that you should be scared of. I mean, you do it in your backyard. There’s not really any way for you to mess it up, other than the fact that you might overcook it or whatever.

But it is a very approachable food. It’s a simple food. It’s been around for hundreds of years in this country. You need to take simple ingredients, things that are already in your pantry. You don’t need try to get out here and make it taste like something it never was intended to be. I was telling someone today, a lot of times we try to make things complicated. And I like chocolate cake and I like my ribs, but I don’t want my ribs tasting like chocolate cake. So keep it simple, and I know that’s kind of a cliche now, but it is [true]. Don’t try to make it something it’s not.


Johnny Trigg and Myron Mixon recipes--UPDATED.

I would fill these pages with overly gratuitous praise for Smokinhusker for the details on Johnny Trig's ribs.

I spent the day smoking some fine local pork ribs and I followed the posted directions to the letter. I made up the Rib Tickler Rub using logical portions (I will be happy to post if anyone wishes and I check back in here *only joined to thank smokinhusker really) and after all was said and done, my wife claims they were the best ribs she has ever eaten in her life. I thought so too- but I am a biased of course.

I have a Dual Fuel Masterbuilt smoker, and it is not a very top shelf device but for the buck seventy five, it is nice as it will use charcoal or propane. It uses a water pan, and while it does not do the 190 to 200 temp range very well- it rocks at 230 to 275 easy as pie. I used the cherry and pecan wood as posted, and it is perfect. I did back off the sugar some due to the comment(s) about the competition style being like "candy" and I wanted to be more neutral until I tweak the process- I will add more sugar to the foil pak next time.

The glaze was trickey as I have never had Trig's ribs to know- but once again, experience with bbq sauces and using logic based instincts on taste, I found a ratio that is simple. I did deviate ever so slightly and add my own angle (we all do, right?) I put a single dollop of Jack Daniels Old #7 shelf bbq sauce in the glaze as I love that stuff. I believe it added just the extra body and depth to the glaze I felt was missing with the basic ingredients listed.

I can assure any reader with guaranteed certainty that I will never smoke my spare ribs any other way again. There is no point in trying to top this- it was the absolute bomb- so good you'll smack your momma. Made my mouth more messed up than a soup sandwich before I was done doing a tongue dance. I have never had such a roaring success on a grill or smoker in my life. I owe it all to the modified 3-2-1 and the fine lady's post here that guided me with simple ease.

This entire forum is worth it's weight in gold for that single post in my humble and amateur opinion.


Johnny Trigg and Myron Mixon recipes--UPDATED.

Gang, I'm shocked that this thread is still alive. I started it over a year ago.

I've read a few postings about specific measurements and timing. Don't copy verbatim what Mixon & Trigg does. First off, they're doing competition style and you'pre doing back yard style. Use their method as a guide and develop your own style.

Trigg's ribs taste like sugar and for me, that defeats the flavor of the pork. Pork shouldn't taste like honey, sugar or whatever. All those extras should just compliment what you're doing.

Also, don't take 3-2-1 as a religion--it's just a guide. If you're going to do 3-2-1, remember that you're SLOW cooking the ribs for about 6 hours, in my opinion and for my taste, , that's to much time. Good cooked ribs shouldnt be falling off the bone nor dried out in the inside. Perfectly cooked ribs, in my opinion should still have a bit of tug on them. And should taste like ribs.

Discover your own method and the only way you can do this is to experiment. I love this website but I'm cautious with the information on here. Take all information with a grain of salt. What one person prefers, someone else might hate.

The basic way that I do ribs is simply this:

1 - Use St. Louis style ribs (which I get from Costco)

3 - Rub the ribs down on both side. I don't smother my ribs with rub but give it a good dusting

4 - For me, I do ribs at 275* (based on this temperature, they SHOULD be ready in 4 hours)

5 -You can leave the ribs on the grill for 4 hours (no peaking) and then test for doneness by either using a toothpick to see if it slides in and out easily or bend the ribs. If they bend easily, they should be done--then take a small bite.

6 - If you really need to foil and put in butter and honey, do it after two hours. Put in whatever you want along with apple juice, foil and back onto the pit for an hour.

7 - After an hour, remove from foil and put the ribs back onto the smoker grate. After 30 minutes, check for doneness. If it's not up to your standard, put it in for another 30 minutes.

There, ribs made easily. It's not rocket science and not necessary to make it complicated. Just good food. But again, ya'll have to decide what's good for you!

What you forgot, was before # 1, you should marinate your Ribs, 24 to 36 hours, overhaul (move) every 12 hours. Then the night before the smoke, rinse them off, dry them off, apply your glue, I use Honey, and rub to both sides. Then wrap in plastic wrap and place in the fridge overnight, then go to # 1 above, the for # 2, before you start the smoker, take the ribs out of the fridge, unwrap and let come up to ambient temperature before you p-lace the meat in the smoker.

You make much better tasting ribs doing that. As per marinades, lots of ways to do that, search the forum to find one you like.

The smoke break

Smoke Blower

I would fill these pages with overly gratuitous praise for Smokinhusker for the details on Johnny Trig's ribs.

I spent the day smoking some fine local pork ribs and I followed the posted directions to the letter. I made up the Rib Tickler Rub using logical portions (I will be happy to post if anyone wishes and I check back in here *only joined to thank smokinhusker really) and after all was said and done, my wife claims they were the best ribs she has ever eaten in her life. I thought so too- but I am a biased of course.

I have a Dual Fuel Masterbuilt smoker, and it is not a very top shelf device but for the buck seventy five, it is nice as it will use charcoal or propane. It uses a water pan, and while it does not do the 190 to 200 temp range very well- it rocks at 230 to 275 easy as pie. I used the cherry and pecan wood as posted, and it is perfect. I did back off the sugar some due to the comment(s) about the competition style being like "candy" and I wanted to be more neutral until I tweak the process- I will add more sugar to the foil pak next time.

The glaze was trickey as I have never had Trig's ribs to know- but once again, experience with bbq sauces and using logic based instincts on taste, I found a ratio that is simple. I did deviate ever so slightly and add my own angle (we all do, right?) I put a single dollop of Jack Daniels Old #7 shelf bbq sauce in the glaze as I love that stuff. I believe it added just the extra body and depth to the glaze I felt was missing with the basic ingredients listed.

I can assure any reader with guaranteed certainty that I will never smoke my spare ribs any other way again. There is no point in trying to top this- it was the absolute bomb- so good you'll smack your momma. Made my mouth more messed up than a soup sandwich before I was done doing a tongue dance. I have never had such a roaring success on a grill or smoker in my life. I owe it all to the modified 3-2-1 and the fine lady's post here that guided me with simple ease.

This entire forum is worth it's weight in gold for that single post in my humble and amateur opinion.


The Only Barbecue Sauce You Need For Pork, Beef, and Anything Else You Pull off the Grill

Editor's note: Use this sauce to make Myron Mixon's Smoked Whiskey Wings .

I have heard people eating barbecue at festivals say that "the sauce makes the barbecue." It's not true. The smoke makes the barbecue. The sauce is a finisher. It's what you put on your meat after it cooks to enhance its appeal. It can add a great punch, but I've had plenty of delicious barbecued meat with no sauce at all. I've been around barbecue sauces of different stripes all of my life. My family's sauce recipe, which my parents were just beginning to market when my father suddenly passed away, is what got me into cooking competitive barbecue in the first place. We have always preferred a hickory-style sauce, meant to closely evoke and complement the flavor of hickory-smoked meats. It's world famous and a secret recipe, so the only way you'll taste the original is to order it from me, but if you insist on not giving me your business, here's a reasonable approximation that is still damn delicious.


Myron Mixon vs Me: The Great Rib-Off

Myron Mixon is without doubt the biggest name in BBQ. He is a three time World BBQ Champion and the chief host of TV’s BBQ Pitmasters. It is therefore no surprise that I, like many countless thousands of others bought his book ‘Smokin’ with Myron Mixon‘.

One of my favourite things to cook is beef short ribs and so naturally I went straight to his recipe – I had to see how it was different to my own. Now I’m pretty proud of my shorties: I managed to pull a 4th place at last year’s Burleigh BBQ Competition, the 2nd biggest BBQ competition in the southern hemisphere. However, it was when I started to read Myron Mixon’s recipe that things got really interesting.

The biggest thing that struck me was the difference in cooking times. Myron’s method prescribes a total of 4 hours and 15 minutes at 275F (135C). I’ve had some absolute disasters working out my own method for cooking shorties, and I mean bad. The first time the ribs were so fatty that they made my wife and I physically ill and I swore I’d never cook them again. However, I’m a sucker for a challenge and I had a few more goes until I hit the formula of 275F until the ribs hit an internal temperature of 203F. Experience taught me that this takes 10 hours on average. This is a lot more than four and a quarter hours. The Winningest Man in Barbecue has to be on to something though and so I decided to run an experiment comparing Myron’s recipes and methods to my own.

Then I got struck with a lightning bolt of genius – I had friends coming around to celebrate Australia Day. I explained to them what I wanted to do and ‘The Great Australia Day Rib-Off’ was born.

Myron Mixon vs Me Part 1: The Spice Rubs

The first thing I had to do was prepare the rub. This is a really straightforward process but is the start of where I had to make some substitutions. Firstly I didn’t have kosher salt so I used pink Himalayan rock salt. I also didn’t have any chili powder so I used some of my homemade smoked chili powder. The rub was so tasty I could have eaten it with a spoon. I trimmed up Myron’s ribs per the instructions, applied the rubs to the ribs and put them in the fridge overnight. This is my spice rub recipe.

Myron Mixon vs Me Part 2: 'Q Time!

Early in the morning, I got up, lit my oldest and dearest Weber and put my ribs on with apple wood chunks, knowing that it was going to be an all-day cook. I also used the opportunity to try out my new Grilla’Que so I could write a review of it. Every hour I cracked the lid and spritzed them with a 50/50 mix of apple juice and organic apple cider vinegar.

Myron Mixon vs Me Part 3: Time to get Sauced!

While my ribs were working on their head start, it was time to start putting together the sauces for the Rib-Off. I love to use a spicy apple BBQ sauce whereas Myron Mixon’s recipe calls for his Tangy Sweet Sauce. Once again, I had to make some substitutions.

To start with, I didn’t have any Jack’s Old South Vinegar Sauce so I had to make some of his Basic Vinegar Sauce from scratch. Firstly I had to use tomato sauce instead of ketchup. I’ve bought both ketchup and tomato sauce from the store in the past and can’t tell the difference between the two. I’ve found a lot of American sources refer to tomato sauce as a Bolognese-like sauce. Australian tomato sauce is definitely not like this.

Secondly, we don’t really have a generic ‘hot sauce’ so I had to improvise. After doing some research I figured the closest thing I could get my hands on was Sriracha Sauce. With the vinegar sauce made I then had to make the the Tangy Sweet Sauce. I couldn’t get a hold of any corn syrup so I substituted it for Golden Syrup and I could get any peach preserves so I had to use peaches and mango in syrup.

It was now that I put Myron’s ribs on. My beloved OTG was at 275F just like the first one and the ribs were also smoked using apple wood chunks. Here, I made a mistake. The recipe calls for the ribs to be cooked in a pan for the first two hours. I forgot about this part and didn’t do it. However I did put the pan in at the two hour mark when the recipe called for water to be added.

Myron Mixon vs Me Part 4: The Unveiling

At the 4 hour mark I basted the ribs with the sauce and returned the pan with the ribs to the ‘Q for another fifteen minutes. The finished product is what you see in the photo above.

The bark and the sauce was delicious and I really liked the fruity overtones of the sauce in particular. I loved the colour too. The smoke ring clearly was pretty good and the pull-back on the bone was excellent. However what I found was that the meat was quite tough: the connective tissues hadn’t melted away and the fat hadn’t rendered as you can see in the middle of the photo above. Sadly the guests weren’t overly impressed and most of this lot ended up in zip-lock bags in the freezer to be recycled into something else later (stay tuned for my Rib Stew Recipe!).

Myron Mixon vs Me Part 5: The Verdict

It wasn’t too much longer that my ribs were ready. I don’t sauce my ribs so the bark was out of this world. The smoke ring was incredible. More importantly, the fat was all rendered off and the connective tissues dissolved. The sharp knife slid through them like butter and not one person touched my sauce, which was both gratifying and annoying as I’d spent an hour and a half making it!

The common court unanimously agreed that my ribs were the winner.

Myron Mixon vs Me Part 6: The Point?

But how can this be? Myron Mixon has been competing and winning BBQ competitions since I was still in high school. There must be a lesson to be learned here.

What it comes down to is regional variance. I didn’t have access to a few herbs, spices and sauces that the recipe called for which would have made a difference. Then there’s the meat: the ribs that would have been available to me would have been undoubtedly different to the ribs available in the States. You may think that a rib is a rib, but one thing I learned when I visited the US is that a steak is not a steak. This difference in cuts would most definitely affect the cooking times for a start: we grill a steak, but we don’t grill a brisket.

What does this mean for us Average Joes? We need to get out on OUR grill and cook OUR meats using OUR ingredients. Again and again and again. Most definitely you should use the recipes of the pros as a guide – the accumulated knowledge in these books is incalculable, but realise that the more you cook, the better your cooking will be. Once you’ve learned how your ‘Q handles ingredients available in your area, you’ll be unstoppable.

In any case, my friends and I learned a lot from this little experiment and had a hell of a lot of fun doing it. And that’s what barbecue is all about.


Myron Mixon 'Jack's Old South Cooking School'

Hi, I have a couple questions for my forum friends who live in the south, namely in the general vicinity of Unadilla Georgia.

As my passion for BBQ grows, my thirst for knowledge follows just behind. I've been to Harry Soo's class twice, taken quite a few classes @ The Woodshed in Anaheim which were incredible and of course have learned quite a bit from this forum.

I think about bbq constantly, sometimes it's all I think about - hope my gf doesn't read this . lol

I find myself wanting to attend Myron Mixon's 3 day class which he holds at his home in Georgia. I've done my research and all reviews say his school is second to none - I'm thinking @ $700 dollars it better be.

So my question is, what is there to do in the surrounding vicinity of Unadilla? I'll be traveling alone and I'd like to see some of the south in the 4 or 5 days I'll be there as I might not ever pass that way again .

As I write this, I'm looking at a map of Unadilla, boy' . it seems to be in the middle of nowhere . lol


The ENTHUSIAST

On a long table covered with clean butcher paper or other sanitary covering, lay long strips of aluminum foil. Place the hog flat on its back on top of the foil. With a very sharp butcher knife, score (i.e., make shallow cuts in the meat) along each side of the spine of the hog, where the ribs connect. Then crack and pull down each side of the hog, starting from the spine. You want the hog to be lying semi-flat so that you can easily reach inside.

Remove the membrane (or “silver”) from the backs of the ribs on each side. Trim away any excess fat on the ham, shoulders, and along the rib cage.

Using a meat saw, split and saw down between the ribs and down each side of the hog: You’re going to cut the ribs on both sides three inches off the spine. This is basically making baby back ribs out of the full spares. Saw only the bone, trying not to pierce the skin on the bottom of the hog. (This makes it easier, after cooking, to serve ribs from the hog.)

Separate the picnic ham of the soldier from the Boston butt. Again, trim both hams of any excess fat. When prepping the shoulder, there is a membrane that you can feel with a Knife that separates the Boston butt end, which is next to the spine, from the picnic ham (or shank). Cut through the membrane, making sure not to cut through the skin. This lays the shoulder so it can crust over and have a good bark.

Load the hog injection into your injector. Out of habit, I always start by injecting the hams first and then I work my way to the head. I injected in seven locations all over the ham, making sure the ham is full to the point of popping. It doesn’t matter where exactly you inject so long as it’s all over the hog. A word of caution: Don’t make more injection holes than necessary, because more holes means more places for the marinade to leak out. Move to the sides of the cavity where the bacon is. It will be covered by the ribs. Inject all along both sides. There are two tenderloins at the end of the spine near the hams. Inject them carefully and do not over-inject (or shoot too much fluid in) if the fluid begins leaking out, you’ll know that you’ve done more than enough. Then move to the shortened ribs that have been cut and inject straight down between the ribs directly against the spine into the loin. Remember not to push the needle through the skin on the bottom of the Hogs back. Now inject the shoulder, butt, and shank (picnic ham). Last, inject the cheek meat (or jowl) along the hog’s jawbone.

Sprinkle the rub throughout the cavity and on the surface of any exposed meat. (Some people think you have to actually “rub” the rub into the meat, but I don’t think that does anything to the taste.) Gather up the foil you’ve laid the hog on and use it to wrap the entire hog loosely

Let the hog sit for 1 hour to soak up all the injection. During this time, light the smoker and bring it to 250 degrees Fahrenheit.

Place the 2 shoulders or brisket flats in the smoker, and then carefully place the hog on top of the shoulders/brisket, so that the extra meat runs the length of the hog directly under the center. Close the smoker and let the hog smoke for about 20 hours, or until the internal temperature of the meatiest part of the shoulder is 205 degrees Fahrenheit. (I often set my hog on the smoker at noon the day before I want to eat it then I remove it at 8 a.m. the next morning.)

Unwrap the foil, and using a brush, apply the hog glaze throughout the inside of the cavity and on the hams. Rewrap the hog loosely in the foil. Leaving the hog on the smoker, let the temperature fall (no more wood is needed at this point). The glaze will caramelize and set while the hog begins to rest and cool down enough so that folks can start pulling the meat. (Unless you’re a professional caterer or otherwise need to prevent the whole hog, the hog is left in the smoker while it is picked and pulled and, best of all, eaten.

In true Southern tradition, a whole hog is never “carved” per se. Wearing clean heavy-duty gloves and using either large tongs or your hands, gently pull the meat out of the hog in chunks and pile it onto large trays or straight onto plates.


The Epicurious Blog

After my friend and colleague Myron Mixon began appearing on the TLC show Pitmasters, people began recognizing him more as "that guy on TV" than as a professional barbecue champion, the so-called "winningest man in barbecue."

Nowadays he&aposs approached all the time about his advice on grills and his favorite barbecue joints new parents ask him to hold their babies. "Sometimes folks even come up to me just to tell me that they hate me. I like that, actually. It makes me want to keep winning even more," he says.

The one thing, though, that Mixon&aposs fans ask him the most is what he likes to eat besides barbecue. It&aposs only natural that because Mixon is an expert in the barbecue field, that people assume that all he eats is barbecue. He doesn&apost, of course.

"Hell, even the Lord took a day off, didn&apost he?" he laughs.

The truth is that Mixon likes all kinds of food, as long as it&aposs good. He says that some of the most fun he has at competitions is coming up with original recipes for the ancillary portions of barbecue contests. These are all about cooking anything but barbecue.

Almost all of the food Mixon gravitates toward is simple stuff: good ingredients, strong flavors, and easy preparation. His nachos are no exception. If you ever find yourself wondering what to do with the last pound of barbecue, they&aposre his solution.

"This is the best damn appetizer in the world, especially good for things like Super Bowl parties and poker games," he says. It&aposs a great way to eat something besides barbecue without having to give up the barbecue."

Myron Mixon&aposs Barbecue Nachos

1 large bag (about 8 ounces) favorite corn tortilla chips
1 pound shredded barbecue pork shoulder, chicken, or brisket
2 cups shredded sharp cheddar cheese (about 6 ounces)
2 cups favorite salsa
3 to 4 pickled jalapeno peppers, thinly sliced
Guacamole (optional)
Sour cream (optional)

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees.

Line a large baking sheet with parchment paper. Spread the chips evenly in one layer across the sheet. Top the chips with the shredded meat, cheese, salsa, and pepper slices.

Place the baking sheet in the oven and bake for about 5 minutes to melt the cheese.

Transfer the nachos to individual plates or just slide them off the parchment onto a platter and take that to the table. Serve immediately, with guacamole and sour cream if you like.


BBQ Pitmaster Myron Mixon Gives Barbecue Tips | News

With grilling season right around the corner, you may want to know how to whip up a meal to impress your friends.

A local Central Georgia man has made his mark on the grill.

Think of Myron Mixon like the Michael Jordan of basketball or the Warren Buffett of business, but Mixon's thing is whole hogs, brisket, and earning all the trophies he can across the planet in barbecue competitions.

Meat has made Myron Mixon the winningest man in barbecue, at least that's what some call him.

The fifty-year-old won Memphis in May which counts as a World Chamionship.

He did that three times and he credits it all to his family and his childhood.

"My dad barbecued ever since I was big enough to remember him, we had a carry-out in Vienna, Georgia, and he cooked once a week," Mixon recalled fondly.

Mixon holds court in his cooking school now at $750 a pop. But he started out humbly doing chores, a task that didn't make him too happy.

"My brother and I helped. We did all the work on the pits where you burn down the wood and shovel the coals. Well, that wasn't fun to me as a teenager. Everybody else was going swimming. I didn't realize it at the time, but I was learning," Mixon said.

Now he's swimming in attention.

Mixon's on the television show "BBQ Pitmasters." He has a cookbook out and he's opened a couple of restaurants in Miami and New York.

Myron's school, which got a mention in Southern Living magazine, caters to cooking teams and the everyday person who just wants a better-tasting dinner.

"Everyone loves being patted on the back, and these guys wind up being the kings and queens of their cul-de-sac, and that's what it's all about," Mixon said with a smile.

To get those bragging rights, he says don't pierce the skin of a hog, use fruit wood in your smoker, and get a hog from a farm don't eat one you kill in the field.

But Myron's number one tip for folks involves patience.

After all this prep, let your hog, brisket, or ribs rest after they come off the grill or smoker.

"If you don't let it rest it, will suck all the natural juices back into the meat," Mixon said. "So if you go into it too fast and start plain that particular piece of meat, then you don't waste all that fine prep."

So it's come full circle for the guy who once groaned about getting out in the backyard.

"I took something that my dad showed me and taught me and made a livelihood out of it. It's something I love to do, and not many people get to make a living doing what they love and I'm one of those people," Mixon proclaimed.

Of all the 700 trophies this guy has won, including the World Championships, he says the one that meant the most to him is when he won the Big Pig Jig for the first time.



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