ss.abravanelhall.net
New recipes

3 Spring Superfoods You Need to Add to Your Oatmeal

3 Spring Superfoods You Need to Add to Your Oatmeal


We are searching data for your request:

Forums and discussions:
Manuals and reference books:
Data from registers:
Wait the end of the search in all databases.
Upon completion, a link will appear to access the found materials.


If you haven’t heard, overnight oats are hip, trendy, and nutritious. Some people have turned overnight oats into an art form, and you can find piles of beautiful pictures of overnight oats on Instagram (whether or not they’re #nofilter or not is debatable). One of the reasons that so many people love overnight oats is that they’re convenient: You can make them the NBC (night before consumption) and reap all of their nutritional benefits in a ready-to-go, breakfast on-the-run fashion.[slideshow]

Click here for 15 Irresistible Overnight Oats Recipes.

With so many varieties of overnight oats and oatmeal in general, some are certainly cleaner than others. If you’re pouring four cups of maple syrup over your oats, regardless of when you’re making them, they’re going to be unhealthy. Luckily for you though, health-conscious reader, certain healthy foods grow more prolifically during the spring. And, if you make a couple of wise decisions, you’ll be able to include some of these spring superfoods into your oatmeal.

Pineapple
Pineapples from the 50th state are in season during April and May. Bromelain, an enzyme found in the juice and stem of pineapples, has been used for what seems to be forever (ever, and ever ever) to help reduce inflammation, lessen the symptoms of hay fever, and slow blood clotting. This superfood works well in oatmeal alongside of raisins and vanilla extract.

Rhubarb
Rhubarb in oatmeal?! You bet. This winter-hardy vegetable is still in season during March, April, and May in the Northern Hemisphere. Hailing from northern Asia, rhubarb can help to keep your liver healthy. It’s also calcium rich and promotes good bone health. There are a couple of baked rhubarb oatmeal recipes out there, but you’ll want to make sure to cut back on the sugary add-ins.

Strawberries
You’ll want to get your strawberry-picking baskets ready as early as April in some warmer American states. It turns out that strawberries may help prevent diabetes, which is the opposite of “not healthy.” Thus, we suggest chopping a few up and adding them into your plain old bowl of oatmeal.


15 Spring Superfoods to Start Eating Now

Spring is only days away, which means it's time to start devouring all the superfoods taking over grocery stores this season. Not only do these nutritionist-approved fruits and veggies taste good, they're ridiculously good for you.

Asparagus does a lot for the body at only 32 calories per cup. Not only is it a great source of fiber, folate, and vitamins A, C, E, and K, but it helps keep everything in check. "Asparagus contains chromium, which may help with blood sugar regulation, provides folate to promote heart health and boost cognitive development, and acts as a diuretic, helping rid the body of excess fluids," says Bonnie Taub-Dix, RDN, creator of BetterThanDieting.com and author of Read It Before You Eat It .

Feel like you might be getting sick? Grab some apricots &mdash and not the sugary packaged kind. "We see apricots more often dried versus fresh, so get them fresh while you can," says Amy Gorin, MS, RDN, owner of Amy Gorin Nutrition in Jersey City, NJ. "Three apricots are only 50 calories and offer about 18% of the daily value for immunity-helping vitamin C."

If you're only eating broccoli florets, it's time to consider eating the stems, too. "Broccoli is very high in antioxidants and provides immunity-helping vitamin C," Gorin says. "Lately, I've been steaming or roasting broccoli as a side dish. I also like to make a salad with the stalks."

There are so many ways to work avocados into your diet &mdash but, unfortunately, that doesn't mean you can just eat guac all day. "Avocados contain heart-healthy fats that also help to keep us full," Gorin says. "I love adding a quarter of an avocado to salads or using the same amount as a topping for an omelet. "

Artichokes might look weird, but they're worth learning how to cook. "For only 60 calories per medium artichoke, they offer so many nutrients," Gorin says. "They're an excellent source of fiber, providing 28 percent of the daily value per artichoke. "

"Mango is a fairly filling fruit, as it's over 80 percent water. I like to have it for dessert, instead cookies or brownies," Gorin says. And considering it's only 100 calories per cup, your waistline will thank you for choosing the fruit over a fattening treat.

It's almost too easy to add lemons into your diet. And for all they offer, take full advantage. " Lemons contain immunity-boosting vitamin C, and the vitamin C also helps you absorb plant-based iron, such as the iron in spinach. Squeeze some lemon juice on your salad or sautéed spinach," Gorin says. But don't stop there! Start your day with some lemon water, too.

When arugula shows up in your salad, get excited: The green &mdash that could easily be mistaken for a weed &mdash is pretty powerful. "It's an excellent source of vitamin A, which benefits your skin and promotes the health of the eyes," Taub-Dix says. "It's also a significant source of vitamin K, which is important for blood clotting and bone building."

Ready for a serious dose of vitamin C? All it takes is a sweet navel orange. Either eat one as a snack, or get a little more creative. "I save the zest as a low-calorie flavor enhancer for making sweet ricotta cream for dessert. They're also great as a topping for a sweet fruit omelet," Gorin says.

This green veggie can seriously boost any meal &mdash and help you stay satisfied and full in the process. "A cup of green peas provides a third of your daily need for fiber," Gorin says. "This is a starchy vegetable, so I suggest eating it instead of a grain &mdash like brown rice &mdash with a meal."

Radishes are often overlooked, but they shouldn't be. Being 95% water, they're not just a great snack for weight loss, but the perfect complement to many foods you already eat. "Radish slices add a nice crunch to a salad. They're also a great topper for an egg-and-avocado open-faced sandwich," Gorin says. "They're full of fiber, vitamin C, and other nutrients."

There are many reasons to love rhubarb, and the tangy taste is only one of them. "A cup of diced rhubarb is only 26 calories yet offers a gram of protein, 9 percent of the daily value for filling fiber, and is a good source of bone-helping calcium," Gorin says.

Shallots look super weird, right? They're often confused as a head of garlic, but they're actually a type of onion. And a super sweet one at that. "Shallots are high in antioxidants," Gorin says. "Mix up your salad by adding a sliced shallot instead of a regular onion."

If you usually toss parsley to the side, it's time to rethink that decision. "Parsley is far from an innocent garnish on your plate &mdash it's a powerful source of vitamin C as well as a good source of folate to help regulate blood pressure," Taub-Dix says. "Parsley also has antiseptic properties, particularly in relation to gum health and the prevention of dental disease. And it contains vitamin K, which is important for proper blood clotting and to help strengthen bones, as well as being a good source of antioxidants."

What's not to love about strawberries? They're low in calories, high in deliciousness, and can be added to just about everything &mdash from salads to dessert. "They're a good source of filling fiber, as a cup of strawberry halves offers 12 percent of the daily value," Gorin says. "Since they're naturally sweet, you can use them to sweeten smoothies, yogurt, or oatmeal."


15 Spring Superfoods to Start Eating Now

Spring is only days away, which means it's time to start devouring all the superfoods taking over grocery stores this season. Not only do these nutritionist-approved fruits and veggies taste good, they're ridiculously good for you.

Asparagus does a lot for the body at only 32 calories per cup. Not only is it a great source of fiber, folate, and vitamins A, C, E, and K, but it helps keep everything in check. "Asparagus contains chromium, which may help with blood sugar regulation, provides folate to promote heart health and boost cognitive development, and acts as a diuretic, helping rid the body of excess fluids," says Bonnie Taub-Dix, RDN, creator of BetterThanDieting.com and author of Read It Before You Eat It .

Feel like you might be getting sick? Grab some apricots &mdash and not the sugary packaged kind. "We see apricots more often dried versus fresh, so get them fresh while you can," says Amy Gorin, MS, RDN, owner of Amy Gorin Nutrition in Jersey City, NJ. "Three apricots are only 50 calories and offer about 18% of the daily value for immunity-helping vitamin C."

If you're only eating broccoli florets, it's time to consider eating the stems, too. "Broccoli is very high in antioxidants and provides immunity-helping vitamin C," Gorin says. "Lately, I've been steaming or roasting broccoli as a side dish. I also like to make a salad with the stalks."

There are so many ways to work avocados into your diet &mdash but, unfortunately, that doesn't mean you can just eat guac all day. "Avocados contain heart-healthy fats that also help to keep us full," Gorin says. "I love adding a quarter of an avocado to salads or using the same amount as a topping for an omelet. "

Artichokes might look weird, but they're worth learning how to cook. "For only 60 calories per medium artichoke, they offer so many nutrients," Gorin says. "They're an excellent source of fiber, providing 28 percent of the daily value per artichoke. "

"Mango is a fairly filling fruit, as it's over 80 percent water. I like to have it for dessert, instead cookies or brownies," Gorin says. And considering it's only 100 calories per cup, your waistline will thank you for choosing the fruit over a fattening treat.

It's almost too easy to add lemons into your diet. And for all they offer, take full advantage. " Lemons contain immunity-boosting vitamin C, and the vitamin C also helps you absorb plant-based iron, such as the iron in spinach. Squeeze some lemon juice on your salad or sautéed spinach," Gorin says. But don't stop there! Start your day with some lemon water, too.

When arugula shows up in your salad, get excited: The green &mdash that could easily be mistaken for a weed &mdash is pretty powerful. "It's an excellent source of vitamin A, which benefits your skin and promotes the health of the eyes," Taub-Dix says. "It's also a significant source of vitamin K, which is important for blood clotting and bone building."

Ready for a serious dose of vitamin C? All it takes is a sweet navel orange. Either eat one as a snack, or get a little more creative. "I save the zest as a low-calorie flavor enhancer for making sweet ricotta cream for dessert. They're also great as a topping for a sweet fruit omelet," Gorin says.

This green veggie can seriously boost any meal &mdash and help you stay satisfied and full in the process. "A cup of green peas provides a third of your daily need for fiber," Gorin says. "This is a starchy vegetable, so I suggest eating it instead of a grain &mdash like brown rice &mdash with a meal."

Radishes are often overlooked, but they shouldn't be. Being 95% water, they're not just a great snack for weight loss, but the perfect complement to many foods you already eat. "Radish slices add a nice crunch to a salad. They're also a great topper for an egg-and-avocado open-faced sandwich," Gorin says. "They're full of fiber, vitamin C, and other nutrients."

There are many reasons to love rhubarb, and the tangy taste is only one of them. "A cup of diced rhubarb is only 26 calories yet offers a gram of protein, 9 percent of the daily value for filling fiber, and is a good source of bone-helping calcium," Gorin says.

Shallots look super weird, right? They're often confused as a head of garlic, but they're actually a type of onion. And a super sweet one at that. "Shallots are high in antioxidants," Gorin says. "Mix up your salad by adding a sliced shallot instead of a regular onion."

If you usually toss parsley to the side, it's time to rethink that decision. "Parsley is far from an innocent garnish on your plate &mdash it's a powerful source of vitamin C as well as a good source of folate to help regulate blood pressure," Taub-Dix says. "Parsley also has antiseptic properties, particularly in relation to gum health and the prevention of dental disease. And it contains vitamin K, which is important for proper blood clotting and to help strengthen bones, as well as being a good source of antioxidants."

What's not to love about strawberries? They're low in calories, high in deliciousness, and can be added to just about everything &mdash from salads to dessert. "They're a good source of filling fiber, as a cup of strawberry halves offers 12 percent of the daily value," Gorin says. "Since they're naturally sweet, you can use them to sweeten smoothies, yogurt, or oatmeal."


15 Spring Superfoods to Start Eating Now

Spring is only days away, which means it's time to start devouring all the superfoods taking over grocery stores this season. Not only do these nutritionist-approved fruits and veggies taste good, they're ridiculously good for you.

Asparagus does a lot for the body at only 32 calories per cup. Not only is it a great source of fiber, folate, and vitamins A, C, E, and K, but it helps keep everything in check. "Asparagus contains chromium, which may help with blood sugar regulation, provides folate to promote heart health and boost cognitive development, and acts as a diuretic, helping rid the body of excess fluids," says Bonnie Taub-Dix, RDN, creator of BetterThanDieting.com and author of Read It Before You Eat It .

Feel like you might be getting sick? Grab some apricots &mdash and not the sugary packaged kind. "We see apricots more often dried versus fresh, so get them fresh while you can," says Amy Gorin, MS, RDN, owner of Amy Gorin Nutrition in Jersey City, NJ. "Three apricots are only 50 calories and offer about 18% of the daily value for immunity-helping vitamin C."

If you're only eating broccoli florets, it's time to consider eating the stems, too. "Broccoli is very high in antioxidants and provides immunity-helping vitamin C," Gorin says. "Lately, I've been steaming or roasting broccoli as a side dish. I also like to make a salad with the stalks."

There are so many ways to work avocados into your diet &mdash but, unfortunately, that doesn't mean you can just eat guac all day. "Avocados contain heart-healthy fats that also help to keep us full," Gorin says. "I love adding a quarter of an avocado to salads or using the same amount as a topping for an omelet. "

Artichokes might look weird, but they're worth learning how to cook. "For only 60 calories per medium artichoke, they offer so many nutrients," Gorin says. "They're an excellent source of fiber, providing 28 percent of the daily value per artichoke. "

"Mango is a fairly filling fruit, as it's over 80 percent water. I like to have it for dessert, instead cookies or brownies," Gorin says. And considering it's only 100 calories per cup, your waistline will thank you for choosing the fruit over a fattening treat.

It's almost too easy to add lemons into your diet. And for all they offer, take full advantage. " Lemons contain immunity-boosting vitamin C, and the vitamin C also helps you absorb plant-based iron, such as the iron in spinach. Squeeze some lemon juice on your salad or sautéed spinach," Gorin says. But don't stop there! Start your day with some lemon water, too.

When arugula shows up in your salad, get excited: The green &mdash that could easily be mistaken for a weed &mdash is pretty powerful. "It's an excellent source of vitamin A, which benefits your skin and promotes the health of the eyes," Taub-Dix says. "It's also a significant source of vitamin K, which is important for blood clotting and bone building."

Ready for a serious dose of vitamin C? All it takes is a sweet navel orange. Either eat one as a snack, or get a little more creative. "I save the zest as a low-calorie flavor enhancer for making sweet ricotta cream for dessert. They're also great as a topping for a sweet fruit omelet," Gorin says.

This green veggie can seriously boost any meal &mdash and help you stay satisfied and full in the process. "A cup of green peas provides a third of your daily need for fiber," Gorin says. "This is a starchy vegetable, so I suggest eating it instead of a grain &mdash like brown rice &mdash with a meal."

Radishes are often overlooked, but they shouldn't be. Being 95% water, they're not just a great snack for weight loss, but the perfect complement to many foods you already eat. "Radish slices add a nice crunch to a salad. They're also a great topper for an egg-and-avocado open-faced sandwich," Gorin says. "They're full of fiber, vitamin C, and other nutrients."

There are many reasons to love rhubarb, and the tangy taste is only one of them. "A cup of diced rhubarb is only 26 calories yet offers a gram of protein, 9 percent of the daily value for filling fiber, and is a good source of bone-helping calcium," Gorin says.

Shallots look super weird, right? They're often confused as a head of garlic, but they're actually a type of onion. And a super sweet one at that. "Shallots are high in antioxidants," Gorin says. "Mix up your salad by adding a sliced shallot instead of a regular onion."

If you usually toss parsley to the side, it's time to rethink that decision. "Parsley is far from an innocent garnish on your plate &mdash it's a powerful source of vitamin C as well as a good source of folate to help regulate blood pressure," Taub-Dix says. "Parsley also has antiseptic properties, particularly in relation to gum health and the prevention of dental disease. And it contains vitamin K, which is important for proper blood clotting and to help strengthen bones, as well as being a good source of antioxidants."

What's not to love about strawberries? They're low in calories, high in deliciousness, and can be added to just about everything &mdash from salads to dessert. "They're a good source of filling fiber, as a cup of strawberry halves offers 12 percent of the daily value," Gorin says. "Since they're naturally sweet, you can use them to sweeten smoothies, yogurt, or oatmeal."


15 Spring Superfoods to Start Eating Now

Spring is only days away, which means it's time to start devouring all the superfoods taking over grocery stores this season. Not only do these nutritionist-approved fruits and veggies taste good, they're ridiculously good for you.

Asparagus does a lot for the body at only 32 calories per cup. Not only is it a great source of fiber, folate, and vitamins A, C, E, and K, but it helps keep everything in check. "Asparagus contains chromium, which may help with blood sugar regulation, provides folate to promote heart health and boost cognitive development, and acts as a diuretic, helping rid the body of excess fluids," says Bonnie Taub-Dix, RDN, creator of BetterThanDieting.com and author of Read It Before You Eat It .

Feel like you might be getting sick? Grab some apricots &mdash and not the sugary packaged kind. "We see apricots more often dried versus fresh, so get them fresh while you can," says Amy Gorin, MS, RDN, owner of Amy Gorin Nutrition in Jersey City, NJ. "Three apricots are only 50 calories and offer about 18% of the daily value for immunity-helping vitamin C."

If you're only eating broccoli florets, it's time to consider eating the stems, too. "Broccoli is very high in antioxidants and provides immunity-helping vitamin C," Gorin says. "Lately, I've been steaming or roasting broccoli as a side dish. I also like to make a salad with the stalks."

There are so many ways to work avocados into your diet &mdash but, unfortunately, that doesn't mean you can just eat guac all day. "Avocados contain heart-healthy fats that also help to keep us full," Gorin says. "I love adding a quarter of an avocado to salads or using the same amount as a topping for an omelet. "

Artichokes might look weird, but they're worth learning how to cook. "For only 60 calories per medium artichoke, they offer so many nutrients," Gorin says. "They're an excellent source of fiber, providing 28 percent of the daily value per artichoke. "

"Mango is a fairly filling fruit, as it's over 80 percent water. I like to have it for dessert, instead cookies or brownies," Gorin says. And considering it's only 100 calories per cup, your waistline will thank you for choosing the fruit over a fattening treat.

It's almost too easy to add lemons into your diet. And for all they offer, take full advantage. " Lemons contain immunity-boosting vitamin C, and the vitamin C also helps you absorb plant-based iron, such as the iron in spinach. Squeeze some lemon juice on your salad or sautéed spinach," Gorin says. But don't stop there! Start your day with some lemon water, too.

When arugula shows up in your salad, get excited: The green &mdash that could easily be mistaken for a weed &mdash is pretty powerful. "It's an excellent source of vitamin A, which benefits your skin and promotes the health of the eyes," Taub-Dix says. "It's also a significant source of vitamin K, which is important for blood clotting and bone building."

Ready for a serious dose of vitamin C? All it takes is a sweet navel orange. Either eat one as a snack, or get a little more creative. "I save the zest as a low-calorie flavor enhancer for making sweet ricotta cream for dessert. They're also great as a topping for a sweet fruit omelet," Gorin says.

This green veggie can seriously boost any meal &mdash and help you stay satisfied and full in the process. "A cup of green peas provides a third of your daily need for fiber," Gorin says. "This is a starchy vegetable, so I suggest eating it instead of a grain &mdash like brown rice &mdash with a meal."

Radishes are often overlooked, but they shouldn't be. Being 95% water, they're not just a great snack for weight loss, but the perfect complement to many foods you already eat. "Radish slices add a nice crunch to a salad. They're also a great topper for an egg-and-avocado open-faced sandwich," Gorin says. "They're full of fiber, vitamin C, and other nutrients."

There are many reasons to love rhubarb, and the tangy taste is only one of them. "A cup of diced rhubarb is only 26 calories yet offers a gram of protein, 9 percent of the daily value for filling fiber, and is a good source of bone-helping calcium," Gorin says.

Shallots look super weird, right? They're often confused as a head of garlic, but they're actually a type of onion. And a super sweet one at that. "Shallots are high in antioxidants," Gorin says. "Mix up your salad by adding a sliced shallot instead of a regular onion."

If you usually toss parsley to the side, it's time to rethink that decision. "Parsley is far from an innocent garnish on your plate &mdash it's a powerful source of vitamin C as well as a good source of folate to help regulate blood pressure," Taub-Dix says. "Parsley also has antiseptic properties, particularly in relation to gum health and the prevention of dental disease. And it contains vitamin K, which is important for proper blood clotting and to help strengthen bones, as well as being a good source of antioxidants."

What's not to love about strawberries? They're low in calories, high in deliciousness, and can be added to just about everything &mdash from salads to dessert. "They're a good source of filling fiber, as a cup of strawberry halves offers 12 percent of the daily value," Gorin says. "Since they're naturally sweet, you can use them to sweeten smoothies, yogurt, or oatmeal."


15 Spring Superfoods to Start Eating Now

Spring is only days away, which means it's time to start devouring all the superfoods taking over grocery stores this season. Not only do these nutritionist-approved fruits and veggies taste good, they're ridiculously good for you.

Asparagus does a lot for the body at only 32 calories per cup. Not only is it a great source of fiber, folate, and vitamins A, C, E, and K, but it helps keep everything in check. "Asparagus contains chromium, which may help with blood sugar regulation, provides folate to promote heart health and boost cognitive development, and acts as a diuretic, helping rid the body of excess fluids," says Bonnie Taub-Dix, RDN, creator of BetterThanDieting.com and author of Read It Before You Eat It .

Feel like you might be getting sick? Grab some apricots &mdash and not the sugary packaged kind. "We see apricots more often dried versus fresh, so get them fresh while you can," says Amy Gorin, MS, RDN, owner of Amy Gorin Nutrition in Jersey City, NJ. "Three apricots are only 50 calories and offer about 18% of the daily value for immunity-helping vitamin C."

If you're only eating broccoli florets, it's time to consider eating the stems, too. "Broccoli is very high in antioxidants and provides immunity-helping vitamin C," Gorin says. "Lately, I've been steaming or roasting broccoli as a side dish. I also like to make a salad with the stalks."

There are so many ways to work avocados into your diet &mdash but, unfortunately, that doesn't mean you can just eat guac all day. "Avocados contain heart-healthy fats that also help to keep us full," Gorin says. "I love adding a quarter of an avocado to salads or using the same amount as a topping for an omelet. "

Artichokes might look weird, but they're worth learning how to cook. "For only 60 calories per medium artichoke, they offer so many nutrients," Gorin says. "They're an excellent source of fiber, providing 28 percent of the daily value per artichoke. "

"Mango is a fairly filling fruit, as it's over 80 percent water. I like to have it for dessert, instead cookies or brownies," Gorin says. And considering it's only 100 calories per cup, your waistline will thank you for choosing the fruit over a fattening treat.

It's almost too easy to add lemons into your diet. And for all they offer, take full advantage. " Lemons contain immunity-boosting vitamin C, and the vitamin C also helps you absorb plant-based iron, such as the iron in spinach. Squeeze some lemon juice on your salad or sautéed spinach," Gorin says. But don't stop there! Start your day with some lemon water, too.

When arugula shows up in your salad, get excited: The green &mdash that could easily be mistaken for a weed &mdash is pretty powerful. "It's an excellent source of vitamin A, which benefits your skin and promotes the health of the eyes," Taub-Dix says. "It's also a significant source of vitamin K, which is important for blood clotting and bone building."

Ready for a serious dose of vitamin C? All it takes is a sweet navel orange. Either eat one as a snack, or get a little more creative. "I save the zest as a low-calorie flavor enhancer for making sweet ricotta cream for dessert. They're also great as a topping for a sweet fruit omelet," Gorin says.

This green veggie can seriously boost any meal &mdash and help you stay satisfied and full in the process. "A cup of green peas provides a third of your daily need for fiber," Gorin says. "This is a starchy vegetable, so I suggest eating it instead of a grain &mdash like brown rice &mdash with a meal."

Radishes are often overlooked, but they shouldn't be. Being 95% water, they're not just a great snack for weight loss, but the perfect complement to many foods you already eat. "Radish slices add a nice crunch to a salad. They're also a great topper for an egg-and-avocado open-faced sandwich," Gorin says. "They're full of fiber, vitamin C, and other nutrients."

There are many reasons to love rhubarb, and the tangy taste is only one of them. "A cup of diced rhubarb is only 26 calories yet offers a gram of protein, 9 percent of the daily value for filling fiber, and is a good source of bone-helping calcium," Gorin says.

Shallots look super weird, right? They're often confused as a head of garlic, but they're actually a type of onion. And a super sweet one at that. "Shallots are high in antioxidants," Gorin says. "Mix up your salad by adding a sliced shallot instead of a regular onion."

If you usually toss parsley to the side, it's time to rethink that decision. "Parsley is far from an innocent garnish on your plate &mdash it's a powerful source of vitamin C as well as a good source of folate to help regulate blood pressure," Taub-Dix says. "Parsley also has antiseptic properties, particularly in relation to gum health and the prevention of dental disease. And it contains vitamin K, which is important for proper blood clotting and to help strengthen bones, as well as being a good source of antioxidants."

What's not to love about strawberries? They're low in calories, high in deliciousness, and can be added to just about everything &mdash from salads to dessert. "They're a good source of filling fiber, as a cup of strawberry halves offers 12 percent of the daily value," Gorin says. "Since they're naturally sweet, you can use them to sweeten smoothies, yogurt, or oatmeal."


15 Spring Superfoods to Start Eating Now

Spring is only days away, which means it's time to start devouring all the superfoods taking over grocery stores this season. Not only do these nutritionist-approved fruits and veggies taste good, they're ridiculously good for you.

Asparagus does a lot for the body at only 32 calories per cup. Not only is it a great source of fiber, folate, and vitamins A, C, E, and K, but it helps keep everything in check. "Asparagus contains chromium, which may help with blood sugar regulation, provides folate to promote heart health and boost cognitive development, and acts as a diuretic, helping rid the body of excess fluids," says Bonnie Taub-Dix, RDN, creator of BetterThanDieting.com and author of Read It Before You Eat It .

Feel like you might be getting sick? Grab some apricots &mdash and not the sugary packaged kind. "We see apricots more often dried versus fresh, so get them fresh while you can," says Amy Gorin, MS, RDN, owner of Amy Gorin Nutrition in Jersey City, NJ. "Three apricots are only 50 calories and offer about 18% of the daily value for immunity-helping vitamin C."

If you're only eating broccoli florets, it's time to consider eating the stems, too. "Broccoli is very high in antioxidants and provides immunity-helping vitamin C," Gorin says. "Lately, I've been steaming or roasting broccoli as a side dish. I also like to make a salad with the stalks."

There are so many ways to work avocados into your diet &mdash but, unfortunately, that doesn't mean you can just eat guac all day. "Avocados contain heart-healthy fats that also help to keep us full," Gorin says. "I love adding a quarter of an avocado to salads or using the same amount as a topping for an omelet. "

Artichokes might look weird, but they're worth learning how to cook. "For only 60 calories per medium artichoke, they offer so many nutrients," Gorin says. "They're an excellent source of fiber, providing 28 percent of the daily value per artichoke. "

"Mango is a fairly filling fruit, as it's over 80 percent water. I like to have it for dessert, instead cookies or brownies," Gorin says. And considering it's only 100 calories per cup, your waistline will thank you for choosing the fruit over a fattening treat.

It's almost too easy to add lemons into your diet. And for all they offer, take full advantage. " Lemons contain immunity-boosting vitamin C, and the vitamin C also helps you absorb plant-based iron, such as the iron in spinach. Squeeze some lemon juice on your salad or sautéed spinach," Gorin says. But don't stop there! Start your day with some lemon water, too.

When arugula shows up in your salad, get excited: The green &mdash that could easily be mistaken for a weed &mdash is pretty powerful. "It's an excellent source of vitamin A, which benefits your skin and promotes the health of the eyes," Taub-Dix says. "It's also a significant source of vitamin K, which is important for blood clotting and bone building."

Ready for a serious dose of vitamin C? All it takes is a sweet navel orange. Either eat one as a snack, or get a little more creative. "I save the zest as a low-calorie flavor enhancer for making sweet ricotta cream for dessert. They're also great as a topping for a sweet fruit omelet," Gorin says.

This green veggie can seriously boost any meal &mdash and help you stay satisfied and full in the process. "A cup of green peas provides a third of your daily need for fiber," Gorin says. "This is a starchy vegetable, so I suggest eating it instead of a grain &mdash like brown rice &mdash with a meal."

Radishes are often overlooked, but they shouldn't be. Being 95% water, they're not just a great snack for weight loss, but the perfect complement to many foods you already eat. "Radish slices add a nice crunch to a salad. They're also a great topper for an egg-and-avocado open-faced sandwich," Gorin says. "They're full of fiber, vitamin C, and other nutrients."

There are many reasons to love rhubarb, and the tangy taste is only one of them. "A cup of diced rhubarb is only 26 calories yet offers a gram of protein, 9 percent of the daily value for filling fiber, and is a good source of bone-helping calcium," Gorin says.

Shallots look super weird, right? They're often confused as a head of garlic, but they're actually a type of onion. And a super sweet one at that. "Shallots are high in antioxidants," Gorin says. "Mix up your salad by adding a sliced shallot instead of a regular onion."

If you usually toss parsley to the side, it's time to rethink that decision. "Parsley is far from an innocent garnish on your plate &mdash it's a powerful source of vitamin C as well as a good source of folate to help regulate blood pressure," Taub-Dix says. "Parsley also has antiseptic properties, particularly in relation to gum health and the prevention of dental disease. And it contains vitamin K, which is important for proper blood clotting and to help strengthen bones, as well as being a good source of antioxidants."

What's not to love about strawberries? They're low in calories, high in deliciousness, and can be added to just about everything &mdash from salads to dessert. "They're a good source of filling fiber, as a cup of strawberry halves offers 12 percent of the daily value," Gorin says. "Since they're naturally sweet, you can use them to sweeten smoothies, yogurt, or oatmeal."


15 Spring Superfoods to Start Eating Now

Spring is only days away, which means it's time to start devouring all the superfoods taking over grocery stores this season. Not only do these nutritionist-approved fruits and veggies taste good, they're ridiculously good for you.

Asparagus does a lot for the body at only 32 calories per cup. Not only is it a great source of fiber, folate, and vitamins A, C, E, and K, but it helps keep everything in check. "Asparagus contains chromium, which may help with blood sugar regulation, provides folate to promote heart health and boost cognitive development, and acts as a diuretic, helping rid the body of excess fluids," says Bonnie Taub-Dix, RDN, creator of BetterThanDieting.com and author of Read It Before You Eat It .

Feel like you might be getting sick? Grab some apricots &mdash and not the sugary packaged kind. "We see apricots more often dried versus fresh, so get them fresh while you can," says Amy Gorin, MS, RDN, owner of Amy Gorin Nutrition in Jersey City, NJ. "Three apricots are only 50 calories and offer about 18% of the daily value for immunity-helping vitamin C."

If you're only eating broccoli florets, it's time to consider eating the stems, too. "Broccoli is very high in antioxidants and provides immunity-helping vitamin C," Gorin says. "Lately, I've been steaming or roasting broccoli as a side dish. I also like to make a salad with the stalks."

There are so many ways to work avocados into your diet &mdash but, unfortunately, that doesn't mean you can just eat guac all day. "Avocados contain heart-healthy fats that also help to keep us full," Gorin says. "I love adding a quarter of an avocado to salads or using the same amount as a topping for an omelet. "

Artichokes might look weird, but they're worth learning how to cook. "For only 60 calories per medium artichoke, they offer so many nutrients," Gorin says. "They're an excellent source of fiber, providing 28 percent of the daily value per artichoke. "

"Mango is a fairly filling fruit, as it's over 80 percent water. I like to have it for dessert, instead cookies or brownies," Gorin says. And considering it's only 100 calories per cup, your waistline will thank you for choosing the fruit over a fattening treat.

It's almost too easy to add lemons into your diet. And for all they offer, take full advantage. " Lemons contain immunity-boosting vitamin C, and the vitamin C also helps you absorb plant-based iron, such as the iron in spinach. Squeeze some lemon juice on your salad or sautéed spinach," Gorin says. But don't stop there! Start your day with some lemon water, too.

When arugula shows up in your salad, get excited: The green &mdash that could easily be mistaken for a weed &mdash is pretty powerful. "It's an excellent source of vitamin A, which benefits your skin and promotes the health of the eyes," Taub-Dix says. "It's also a significant source of vitamin K, which is important for blood clotting and bone building."

Ready for a serious dose of vitamin C? All it takes is a sweet navel orange. Either eat one as a snack, or get a little more creative. "I save the zest as a low-calorie flavor enhancer for making sweet ricotta cream for dessert. They're also great as a topping for a sweet fruit omelet," Gorin says.

This green veggie can seriously boost any meal &mdash and help you stay satisfied and full in the process. "A cup of green peas provides a third of your daily need for fiber," Gorin says. "This is a starchy vegetable, so I suggest eating it instead of a grain &mdash like brown rice &mdash with a meal."

Radishes are often overlooked, but they shouldn't be. Being 95% water, they're not just a great snack for weight loss, but the perfect complement to many foods you already eat. "Radish slices add a nice crunch to a salad. They're also a great topper for an egg-and-avocado open-faced sandwich," Gorin says. "They're full of fiber, vitamin C, and other nutrients."

There are many reasons to love rhubarb, and the tangy taste is only one of them. "A cup of diced rhubarb is only 26 calories yet offers a gram of protein, 9 percent of the daily value for filling fiber, and is a good source of bone-helping calcium," Gorin says.

Shallots look super weird, right? They're often confused as a head of garlic, but they're actually a type of onion. And a super sweet one at that. "Shallots are high in antioxidants," Gorin says. "Mix up your salad by adding a sliced shallot instead of a regular onion."

If you usually toss parsley to the side, it's time to rethink that decision. "Parsley is far from an innocent garnish on your plate &mdash it's a powerful source of vitamin C as well as a good source of folate to help regulate blood pressure," Taub-Dix says. "Parsley also has antiseptic properties, particularly in relation to gum health and the prevention of dental disease. And it contains vitamin K, which is important for proper blood clotting and to help strengthen bones, as well as being a good source of antioxidants."

What's not to love about strawberries? They're low in calories, high in deliciousness, and can be added to just about everything &mdash from salads to dessert. "They're a good source of filling fiber, as a cup of strawberry halves offers 12 percent of the daily value," Gorin says. "Since they're naturally sweet, you can use them to sweeten smoothies, yogurt, or oatmeal."


15 Spring Superfoods to Start Eating Now

Spring is only days away, which means it's time to start devouring all the superfoods taking over grocery stores this season. Not only do these nutritionist-approved fruits and veggies taste good, they're ridiculously good for you.

Asparagus does a lot for the body at only 32 calories per cup. Not only is it a great source of fiber, folate, and vitamins A, C, E, and K, but it helps keep everything in check. "Asparagus contains chromium, which may help with blood sugar regulation, provides folate to promote heart health and boost cognitive development, and acts as a diuretic, helping rid the body of excess fluids," says Bonnie Taub-Dix, RDN, creator of BetterThanDieting.com and author of Read It Before You Eat It .

Feel like you might be getting sick? Grab some apricots &mdash and not the sugary packaged kind. "We see apricots more often dried versus fresh, so get them fresh while you can," says Amy Gorin, MS, RDN, owner of Amy Gorin Nutrition in Jersey City, NJ. "Three apricots are only 50 calories and offer about 18% of the daily value for immunity-helping vitamin C."

If you're only eating broccoli florets, it's time to consider eating the stems, too. "Broccoli is very high in antioxidants and provides immunity-helping vitamin C," Gorin says. "Lately, I've been steaming or roasting broccoli as a side dish. I also like to make a salad with the stalks."

There are so many ways to work avocados into your diet &mdash but, unfortunately, that doesn't mean you can just eat guac all day. "Avocados contain heart-healthy fats that also help to keep us full," Gorin says. "I love adding a quarter of an avocado to salads or using the same amount as a topping for an omelet. "

Artichokes might look weird, but they're worth learning how to cook. "For only 60 calories per medium artichoke, they offer so many nutrients," Gorin says. "They're an excellent source of fiber, providing 28 percent of the daily value per artichoke. "

"Mango is a fairly filling fruit, as it's over 80 percent water. I like to have it for dessert, instead cookies or brownies," Gorin says. And considering it's only 100 calories per cup, your waistline will thank you for choosing the fruit over a fattening treat.

It's almost too easy to add lemons into your diet. And for all they offer, take full advantage. " Lemons contain immunity-boosting vitamin C, and the vitamin C also helps you absorb plant-based iron, such as the iron in spinach. Squeeze some lemon juice on your salad or sautéed spinach," Gorin says. But don't stop there! Start your day with some lemon water, too.

When arugula shows up in your salad, get excited: The green &mdash that could easily be mistaken for a weed &mdash is pretty powerful. "It's an excellent source of vitamin A, which benefits your skin and promotes the health of the eyes," Taub-Dix says. "It's also a significant source of vitamin K, which is important for blood clotting and bone building."

Ready for a serious dose of vitamin C? All it takes is a sweet navel orange. Either eat one as a snack, or get a little more creative. "I save the zest as a low-calorie flavor enhancer for making sweet ricotta cream for dessert. They're also great as a topping for a sweet fruit omelet," Gorin says.

This green veggie can seriously boost any meal &mdash and help you stay satisfied and full in the process. "A cup of green peas provides a third of your daily need for fiber," Gorin says. "This is a starchy vegetable, so I suggest eating it instead of a grain &mdash like brown rice &mdash with a meal."

Radishes are often overlooked, but they shouldn't be. Being 95% water, they're not just a great snack for weight loss, but the perfect complement to many foods you already eat. "Radish slices add a nice crunch to a salad. They're also a great topper for an egg-and-avocado open-faced sandwich," Gorin says. "They're full of fiber, vitamin C, and other nutrients."

There are many reasons to love rhubarb, and the tangy taste is only one of them. "A cup of diced rhubarb is only 26 calories yet offers a gram of protein, 9 percent of the daily value for filling fiber, and is a good source of bone-helping calcium," Gorin says.

Shallots look super weird, right? They're often confused as a head of garlic, but they're actually a type of onion. And a super sweet one at that. "Shallots are high in antioxidants," Gorin says. "Mix up your salad by adding a sliced shallot instead of a regular onion."

If you usually toss parsley to the side, it's time to rethink that decision. "Parsley is far from an innocent garnish on your plate &mdash it's a powerful source of vitamin C as well as a good source of folate to help regulate blood pressure," Taub-Dix says. "Parsley also has antiseptic properties, particularly in relation to gum health and the prevention of dental disease. And it contains vitamin K, which is important for proper blood clotting and to help strengthen bones, as well as being a good source of antioxidants."

What's not to love about strawberries? They're low in calories, high in deliciousness, and can be added to just about everything &mdash from salads to dessert. "They're a good source of filling fiber, as a cup of strawberry halves offers 12 percent of the daily value," Gorin says. "Since they're naturally sweet, you can use them to sweeten smoothies, yogurt, or oatmeal."


15 Spring Superfoods to Start Eating Now

Spring is only days away, which means it's time to start devouring all the superfoods taking over grocery stores this season. Not only do these nutritionist-approved fruits and veggies taste good, they're ridiculously good for you.

Asparagus does a lot for the body at only 32 calories per cup. Not only is it a great source of fiber, folate, and vitamins A, C, E, and K, but it helps keep everything in check. "Asparagus contains chromium, which may help with blood sugar regulation, provides folate to promote heart health and boost cognitive development, and acts as a diuretic, helping rid the body of excess fluids," says Bonnie Taub-Dix, RDN, creator of BetterThanDieting.com and author of Read It Before You Eat It .

Feel like you might be getting sick? Grab some apricots &mdash and not the sugary packaged kind. "We see apricots more often dried versus fresh, so get them fresh while you can," says Amy Gorin, MS, RDN, owner of Amy Gorin Nutrition in Jersey City, NJ. "Three apricots are only 50 calories and offer about 18% of the daily value for immunity-helping vitamin C."

If you're only eating broccoli florets, it's time to consider eating the stems, too. "Broccoli is very high in antioxidants and provides immunity-helping vitamin C," Gorin says. "Lately, I've been steaming or roasting broccoli as a side dish. I also like to make a salad with the stalks."

There are so many ways to work avocados into your diet &mdash but, unfortunately, that doesn't mean you can just eat guac all day. "Avocados contain heart-healthy fats that also help to keep us full," Gorin says. "I love adding a quarter of an avocado to salads or using the same amount as a topping for an omelet. "

Artichokes might look weird, but they're worth learning how to cook. "For only 60 calories per medium artichoke, they offer so many nutrients," Gorin says. "They're an excellent source of fiber, providing 28 percent of the daily value per artichoke. "

"Mango is a fairly filling fruit, as it's over 80 percent water. I like to have it for dessert, instead cookies or brownies," Gorin says. And considering it's only 100 calories per cup, your waistline will thank you for choosing the fruit over a fattening treat.

It's almost too easy to add lemons into your diet. And for all they offer, take full advantage. " Lemons contain immunity-boosting vitamin C, and the vitamin C also helps you absorb plant-based iron, such as the iron in spinach. Squeeze some lemon juice on your salad or sautéed spinach," Gorin says. But don't stop there! Start your day with some lemon water, too.

When arugula shows up in your salad, get excited: The green &mdash that could easily be mistaken for a weed &mdash is pretty powerful. "It's an excellent source of vitamin A, which benefits your skin and promotes the health of the eyes," Taub-Dix says. "It's also a significant source of vitamin K, which is important for blood clotting and bone building."

Ready for a serious dose of vitamin C? All it takes is a sweet navel orange. Either eat one as a snack, or get a little more creative. "I save the zest as a low-calorie flavor enhancer for making sweet ricotta cream for dessert. They're also great as a topping for a sweet fruit omelet," Gorin says.

This green veggie can seriously boost any meal &mdash and help you stay satisfied and full in the process. "A cup of green peas provides a third of your daily need for fiber," Gorin says. "This is a starchy vegetable, so I suggest eating it instead of a grain &mdash like brown rice &mdash with a meal."

Radishes are often overlooked, but they shouldn't be. Being 95% water, they're not just a great snack for weight loss, but the perfect complement to many foods you already eat. "Radish slices add a nice crunch to a salad. They're also a great topper for an egg-and-avocado open-faced sandwich," Gorin says. "They're full of fiber, vitamin C, and other nutrients."

There are many reasons to love rhubarb, and the tangy taste is only one of them. "A cup of diced rhubarb is only 26 calories yet offers a gram of protein, 9 percent of the daily value for filling fiber, and is a good source of bone-helping calcium," Gorin says.

Shallots look super weird, right? They're often confused as a head of garlic, but they're actually a type of onion. And a super sweet one at that. "Shallots are high in antioxidants," Gorin says. "Mix up your salad by adding a sliced shallot instead of a regular onion."

If you usually toss parsley to the side, it's time to rethink that decision. "Parsley is far from an innocent garnish on your plate &mdash it's a powerful source of vitamin C as well as a good source of folate to help regulate blood pressure," Taub-Dix says. "Parsley also has antiseptic properties, particularly in relation to gum health and the prevention of dental disease. And it contains vitamin K, which is important for proper blood clotting and to help strengthen bones, as well as being a good source of antioxidants."

What's not to love about strawberries? They're low in calories, high in deliciousness, and can be added to just about everything &mdash from salads to dessert. "They're a good source of filling fiber, as a cup of strawberry halves offers 12 percent of the daily value," Gorin says. "Since they're naturally sweet, you can use them to sweeten smoothies, yogurt, or oatmeal."


15 Spring Superfoods to Start Eating Now

Spring is only days away, which means it's time to start devouring all the superfoods taking over grocery stores this season. Not only do these nutritionist-approved fruits and veggies taste good, they're ridiculously good for you.

Asparagus does a lot for the body at only 32 calories per cup. Not only is it a great source of fiber, folate, and vitamins A, C, E, and K, but it helps keep everything in check. "Asparagus contains chromium, which may help with blood sugar regulation, provides folate to promote heart health and boost cognitive development, and acts as a diuretic, helping rid the body of excess fluids," says Bonnie Taub-Dix, RDN, creator of BetterThanDieting.com and author of Read It Before You Eat It .

Feel like you might be getting sick? Grab some apricots &mdash and not the sugary packaged kind. "We see apricots more often dried versus fresh, so get them fresh while you can," says Amy Gorin, MS, RDN, owner of Amy Gorin Nutrition in Jersey City, NJ. "Three apricots are only 50 calories and offer about 18% of the daily value for immunity-helping vitamin C."

If you're only eating broccoli florets, it's time to consider eating the stems, too. "Broccoli is very high in antioxidants and provides immunity-helping vitamin C," Gorin says. "Lately, I've been steaming or roasting broccoli as a side dish. I also like to make a salad with the stalks."

There are so many ways to work avocados into your diet &mdash but, unfortunately, that doesn't mean you can just eat guac all day. "Avocados contain heart-healthy fats that also help to keep us full," Gorin says. "I love adding a quarter of an avocado to salads or using the same amount as a topping for an omelet. "

Artichokes might look weird, but they're worth learning how to cook. "For only 60 calories per medium artichoke, they offer so many nutrients," Gorin says. "They're an excellent source of fiber, providing 28 percent of the daily value per artichoke. "

"Mango is a fairly filling fruit, as it's over 80 percent water. I like to have it for dessert, instead cookies or brownies," Gorin says. And considering it's only 100 calories per cup, your waistline will thank you for choosing the fruit over a fattening treat.

It's almost too easy to add lemons into your diet. And for all they offer, take full advantage. " Lemons contain immunity-boosting vitamin C, and the vitamin C also helps you absorb plant-based iron, such as the iron in spinach. Squeeze some lemon juice on your salad or sautéed spinach," Gorin says. But don't stop there! Start your day with some lemon water, too.

When arugula shows up in your salad, get excited: The green &mdash that could easily be mistaken for a weed &mdash is pretty powerful. "It's an excellent source of vitamin A, which benefits your skin and promotes the health of the eyes," Taub-Dix says. "It's also a significant source of vitamin K, which is important for blood clotting and bone building."

Ready for a serious dose of vitamin C? All it takes is a sweet navel orange. Either eat one as a snack, or get a little more creative. "I save the zest as a low-calorie flavor enhancer for making sweet ricotta cream for dessert. They're also great as a topping for a sweet fruit omelet," Gorin says.

This green veggie can seriously boost any meal &mdash and help you stay satisfied and full in the process. "A cup of green peas provides a third of your daily need for fiber," Gorin says. "This is a starchy vegetable, so I suggest eating it instead of a grain &mdash like brown rice &mdash with a meal."

Radishes are often overlooked, but they shouldn't be. Being 95% water, they're not just a great snack for weight loss, but the perfect complement to many foods you already eat. "Radish slices add a nice crunch to a salad. They're also a great topper for an egg-and-avocado open-faced sandwich," Gorin says. "They're full of fiber, vitamin C, and other nutrients."

There are many reasons to love rhubarb, and the tangy taste is only one of them. "A cup of diced rhubarb is only 26 calories yet offers a gram of protein, 9 percent of the daily value for filling fiber, and is a good source of bone-helping calcium," Gorin says.

Shallots look super weird, right? They're often confused as a head of garlic, but they're actually a type of onion. And a super sweet one at that. "Shallots are high in antioxidants," Gorin says. "Mix up your salad by adding a sliced shallot instead of a regular onion."

If you usually toss parsley to the side, it's time to rethink that decision. "Parsley is far from an innocent garnish on your plate &mdash it's a powerful source of vitamin C as well as a good source of folate to help regulate blood pressure," Taub-Dix says. "Parsley also has antiseptic properties, particularly in relation to gum health and the prevention of dental disease. And it contains vitamin K, which is important for proper blood clotting and to help strengthen bones, as well as being a good source of antioxidants."

What's not to love about strawberries? They're low in calories, high in deliciousness, and can be added to just about everything &mdash from salads to dessert. "They're a good source of filling fiber, as a cup of strawberry halves offers 12 percent of the daily value," Gorin says. "Since they're naturally sweet, you can use them to sweeten smoothies, yogurt, or oatmeal."



Comments:

  1. Peredur

    Of course you are right. In this nothing in there and I think this is a very good idea.

  2. Shakahn

    excellent quality you can download

  3. Faezragore

    This is a precious thing

  4. Zugul

    It seems to me that the idea in this article is not fully disclosed. Author, can you add something to this?

  5. Grozil

    I was pleasantly surprised how the author easily writes about everything that interests him. There is something in this!

  6. Theodorus

    An incomparable topic, I really like it))))



Write a message