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Here’s How You Can Get Away With Eating Ice Cream for Breakfast

Here’s How You Can Get Away With Eating Ice Cream for Breakfast


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Start your day the Italian way: with coffee granita and freshly whipped cream

Espresso granita is a classic Italian breakfast.

When the summer heat is too much to handle (it seems to be at that point when we start sweating as soon as we step outside), eating breakfast begins to lose its appeal. In the summer months, we sometimes develop a habit of skipping our healthy oatmeal or scrambled egg whites, and just drinking a huge iced coffee instead. Obviously, we make up for the calories later in the day with several scoops of ice cream. But not any more: We’ve found our new favorite way to cool down, by eating ice cream for breakfast.

The Italians are always ahead of the game when it comes to creating and enjoying the most spectacular foods. They’ve even perfected the art of summer breakfast, with a dish that we’re keen to get on board with. Start your day with an espresso granita topped with whipped cream, and you’ll be bouncing out the door, cooled, awake, and fueled with enough energy to keep you going for at least a couple of hours. You can get the full recipe for this unbeatable breakfast here. It’s simple to make, and one batch will keep you going for at least a few days.

While it’s true that this may not be the healthiest breakfast, it’s definitely an acceptable, widely recognized (in Italy at least) way to start your day, and that’s as much as we’re asking for in the searing heat of these sun-filled months. A glass of shaved iced coffee shards, with melting, gently whipped peaks of cream dolloped on top is what we’ll be enjoying every morning for the rest of the summer.


These Magical Bananas Taste Exactly Like Ice Cream

While there are more than a thousand different types of bananas around the world, most of us, sadly, only know the Cavendish variety.

Cavendish bananas are hearty and can survive overseas shipping, but they are definitely not the most delicious. That title, for our money, belongs to ice cream bananas, which can be found easily in Hawaii, as well as other tropical environments in southeast Asia and central America.

Like its name suggests, the ice cream banana is sweet with undeniable hints of vanilla and its skin even appears frosted, starting out as a bluish-green color before it ripens.

At its most ripe stage, its texture is fluffier and creamier than the typical Chiquita you'll find at the store, and they practically melt in your mouth.

As sinful as they sound, ice cream bananas don't contain artificial sweeteners, flavors or additives. They're just born that way.

Ice cream bananas (also known as blue java bananas) may be a specialty fruit, but they aren't anything new. Farmers have been growing these sweet fruits in Hawaii since the early 1920s, according to Ken Love, executive director of Hawaii Tropical Fruit Growers, and in other tropical regions for ages.

"There are over 100 types of bananas in Hawaii, all tasting different," Love told The Huffington Post. "It's really the diversity that's interesting."

And ice cream bananas, Love adds, aren't even the sweetest variety.

As he explains on the website HawaiiFruit.net, banana plants mutate naturally, giving different bananas a variety of distinct flavors and characteristics such as apple bananas (which have hints of sweet citrus) and the Mysore banana (which tastes like berries, according to one Hawaii grower).

"Bananas are usually classified in terms of their chromosomes," Love told HuffPost. "Those chromosomes are made up of A -- acimnata, the sweetness and the sugar -- or B -- balbisiana, the starch."

The ice cream banana (which is part of the ABB genomic group), as Love explained, is one part sugar and two parts starch. "In this case," he said, "the starch converts to sugar when they're fully ripe."

When they're very ripe and soft, Love likes to spread ice cream bananas over toast like butter. They also make a perfect ice cream alternative when frozen and blended.


These Magical Bananas Taste Exactly Like Ice Cream

While there are more than a thousand different types of bananas around the world, most of us, sadly, only know the Cavendish variety.

Cavendish bananas are hearty and can survive overseas shipping, but they are definitely not the most delicious. That title, for our money, belongs to ice cream bananas, which can be found easily in Hawaii, as well as other tropical environments in southeast Asia and central America.

Like its name suggests, the ice cream banana is sweet with undeniable hints of vanilla and its skin even appears frosted, starting out as a bluish-green color before it ripens.

At its most ripe stage, its texture is fluffier and creamier than the typical Chiquita you'll find at the store, and they practically melt in your mouth.

As sinful as they sound, ice cream bananas don't contain artificial sweeteners, flavors or additives. They're just born that way.

Ice cream bananas (also known as blue java bananas) may be a specialty fruit, but they aren't anything new. Farmers have been growing these sweet fruits in Hawaii since the early 1920s, according to Ken Love, executive director of Hawaii Tropical Fruit Growers, and in other tropical regions for ages.

"There are over 100 types of bananas in Hawaii, all tasting different," Love told The Huffington Post. "It's really the diversity that's interesting."

And ice cream bananas, Love adds, aren't even the sweetest variety.

As he explains on the website HawaiiFruit.net, banana plants mutate naturally, giving different bananas a variety of distinct flavors and characteristics such as apple bananas (which have hints of sweet citrus) and the Mysore banana (which tastes like berries, according to one Hawaii grower).

"Bananas are usually classified in terms of their chromosomes," Love told HuffPost. "Those chromosomes are made up of A -- acimnata, the sweetness and the sugar -- or B -- balbisiana, the starch."

The ice cream banana (which is part of the ABB genomic group), as Love explained, is one part sugar and two parts starch. "In this case," he said, "the starch converts to sugar when they're fully ripe."

When they're very ripe and soft, Love likes to spread ice cream bananas over toast like butter. They also make a perfect ice cream alternative when frozen and blended.


These Magical Bananas Taste Exactly Like Ice Cream

While there are more than a thousand different types of bananas around the world, most of us, sadly, only know the Cavendish variety.

Cavendish bananas are hearty and can survive overseas shipping, but they are definitely not the most delicious. That title, for our money, belongs to ice cream bananas, which can be found easily in Hawaii, as well as other tropical environments in southeast Asia and central America.

Like its name suggests, the ice cream banana is sweet with undeniable hints of vanilla and its skin even appears frosted, starting out as a bluish-green color before it ripens.

At its most ripe stage, its texture is fluffier and creamier than the typical Chiquita you'll find at the store, and they practically melt in your mouth.

As sinful as they sound, ice cream bananas don't contain artificial sweeteners, flavors or additives. They're just born that way.

Ice cream bananas (also known as blue java bananas) may be a specialty fruit, but they aren't anything new. Farmers have been growing these sweet fruits in Hawaii since the early 1920s, according to Ken Love, executive director of Hawaii Tropical Fruit Growers, and in other tropical regions for ages.

"There are over 100 types of bananas in Hawaii, all tasting different," Love told The Huffington Post. "It's really the diversity that's interesting."

And ice cream bananas, Love adds, aren't even the sweetest variety.

As he explains on the website HawaiiFruit.net, banana plants mutate naturally, giving different bananas a variety of distinct flavors and characteristics such as apple bananas (which have hints of sweet citrus) and the Mysore banana (which tastes like berries, according to one Hawaii grower).

"Bananas are usually classified in terms of their chromosomes," Love told HuffPost. "Those chromosomes are made up of A -- acimnata, the sweetness and the sugar -- or B -- balbisiana, the starch."

The ice cream banana (which is part of the ABB genomic group), as Love explained, is one part sugar and two parts starch. "In this case," he said, "the starch converts to sugar when they're fully ripe."

When they're very ripe and soft, Love likes to spread ice cream bananas over toast like butter. They also make a perfect ice cream alternative when frozen and blended.


These Magical Bananas Taste Exactly Like Ice Cream

While there are more than a thousand different types of bananas around the world, most of us, sadly, only know the Cavendish variety.

Cavendish bananas are hearty and can survive overseas shipping, but they are definitely not the most delicious. That title, for our money, belongs to ice cream bananas, which can be found easily in Hawaii, as well as other tropical environments in southeast Asia and central America.

Like its name suggests, the ice cream banana is sweet with undeniable hints of vanilla and its skin even appears frosted, starting out as a bluish-green color before it ripens.

At its most ripe stage, its texture is fluffier and creamier than the typical Chiquita you'll find at the store, and they practically melt in your mouth.

As sinful as they sound, ice cream bananas don't contain artificial sweeteners, flavors or additives. They're just born that way.

Ice cream bananas (also known as blue java bananas) may be a specialty fruit, but they aren't anything new. Farmers have been growing these sweet fruits in Hawaii since the early 1920s, according to Ken Love, executive director of Hawaii Tropical Fruit Growers, and in other tropical regions for ages.

"There are over 100 types of bananas in Hawaii, all tasting different," Love told The Huffington Post. "It's really the diversity that's interesting."

And ice cream bananas, Love adds, aren't even the sweetest variety.

As he explains on the website HawaiiFruit.net, banana plants mutate naturally, giving different bananas a variety of distinct flavors and characteristics such as apple bananas (which have hints of sweet citrus) and the Mysore banana (which tastes like berries, according to one Hawaii grower).

"Bananas are usually classified in terms of their chromosomes," Love told HuffPost. "Those chromosomes are made up of A -- acimnata, the sweetness and the sugar -- or B -- balbisiana, the starch."

The ice cream banana (which is part of the ABB genomic group), as Love explained, is one part sugar and two parts starch. "In this case," he said, "the starch converts to sugar when they're fully ripe."

When they're very ripe and soft, Love likes to spread ice cream bananas over toast like butter. They also make a perfect ice cream alternative when frozen and blended.


These Magical Bananas Taste Exactly Like Ice Cream

While there are more than a thousand different types of bananas around the world, most of us, sadly, only know the Cavendish variety.

Cavendish bananas are hearty and can survive overseas shipping, but they are definitely not the most delicious. That title, for our money, belongs to ice cream bananas, which can be found easily in Hawaii, as well as other tropical environments in southeast Asia and central America.

Like its name suggests, the ice cream banana is sweet with undeniable hints of vanilla and its skin even appears frosted, starting out as a bluish-green color before it ripens.

At its most ripe stage, its texture is fluffier and creamier than the typical Chiquita you'll find at the store, and they practically melt in your mouth.

As sinful as they sound, ice cream bananas don't contain artificial sweeteners, flavors or additives. They're just born that way.

Ice cream bananas (also known as blue java bananas) may be a specialty fruit, but they aren't anything new. Farmers have been growing these sweet fruits in Hawaii since the early 1920s, according to Ken Love, executive director of Hawaii Tropical Fruit Growers, and in other tropical regions for ages.

"There are over 100 types of bananas in Hawaii, all tasting different," Love told The Huffington Post. "It's really the diversity that's interesting."

And ice cream bananas, Love adds, aren't even the sweetest variety.

As he explains on the website HawaiiFruit.net, banana plants mutate naturally, giving different bananas a variety of distinct flavors and characteristics such as apple bananas (which have hints of sweet citrus) and the Mysore banana (which tastes like berries, according to one Hawaii grower).

"Bananas are usually classified in terms of their chromosomes," Love told HuffPost. "Those chromosomes are made up of A -- acimnata, the sweetness and the sugar -- or B -- balbisiana, the starch."

The ice cream banana (which is part of the ABB genomic group), as Love explained, is one part sugar and two parts starch. "In this case," he said, "the starch converts to sugar when they're fully ripe."

When they're very ripe and soft, Love likes to spread ice cream bananas over toast like butter. They also make a perfect ice cream alternative when frozen and blended.


These Magical Bananas Taste Exactly Like Ice Cream

While there are more than a thousand different types of bananas around the world, most of us, sadly, only know the Cavendish variety.

Cavendish bananas are hearty and can survive overseas shipping, but they are definitely not the most delicious. That title, for our money, belongs to ice cream bananas, which can be found easily in Hawaii, as well as other tropical environments in southeast Asia and central America.

Like its name suggests, the ice cream banana is sweet with undeniable hints of vanilla and its skin even appears frosted, starting out as a bluish-green color before it ripens.

At its most ripe stage, its texture is fluffier and creamier than the typical Chiquita you'll find at the store, and they practically melt in your mouth.

As sinful as they sound, ice cream bananas don't contain artificial sweeteners, flavors or additives. They're just born that way.

Ice cream bananas (also known as blue java bananas) may be a specialty fruit, but they aren't anything new. Farmers have been growing these sweet fruits in Hawaii since the early 1920s, according to Ken Love, executive director of Hawaii Tropical Fruit Growers, and in other tropical regions for ages.

"There are over 100 types of bananas in Hawaii, all tasting different," Love told The Huffington Post. "It's really the diversity that's interesting."

And ice cream bananas, Love adds, aren't even the sweetest variety.

As he explains on the website HawaiiFruit.net, banana plants mutate naturally, giving different bananas a variety of distinct flavors and characteristics such as apple bananas (which have hints of sweet citrus) and the Mysore banana (which tastes like berries, according to one Hawaii grower).

"Bananas are usually classified in terms of their chromosomes," Love told HuffPost. "Those chromosomes are made up of A -- acimnata, the sweetness and the sugar -- or B -- balbisiana, the starch."

The ice cream banana (which is part of the ABB genomic group), as Love explained, is one part sugar and two parts starch. "In this case," he said, "the starch converts to sugar when they're fully ripe."

When they're very ripe and soft, Love likes to spread ice cream bananas over toast like butter. They also make a perfect ice cream alternative when frozen and blended.


These Magical Bananas Taste Exactly Like Ice Cream

While there are more than a thousand different types of bananas around the world, most of us, sadly, only know the Cavendish variety.

Cavendish bananas are hearty and can survive overseas shipping, but they are definitely not the most delicious. That title, for our money, belongs to ice cream bananas, which can be found easily in Hawaii, as well as other tropical environments in southeast Asia and central America.

Like its name suggests, the ice cream banana is sweet with undeniable hints of vanilla and its skin even appears frosted, starting out as a bluish-green color before it ripens.

At its most ripe stage, its texture is fluffier and creamier than the typical Chiquita you'll find at the store, and they practically melt in your mouth.

As sinful as they sound, ice cream bananas don't contain artificial sweeteners, flavors or additives. They're just born that way.

Ice cream bananas (also known as blue java bananas) may be a specialty fruit, but they aren't anything new. Farmers have been growing these sweet fruits in Hawaii since the early 1920s, according to Ken Love, executive director of Hawaii Tropical Fruit Growers, and in other tropical regions for ages.

"There are over 100 types of bananas in Hawaii, all tasting different," Love told The Huffington Post. "It's really the diversity that's interesting."

And ice cream bananas, Love adds, aren't even the sweetest variety.

As he explains on the website HawaiiFruit.net, banana plants mutate naturally, giving different bananas a variety of distinct flavors and characteristics such as apple bananas (which have hints of sweet citrus) and the Mysore banana (which tastes like berries, according to one Hawaii grower).

"Bananas are usually classified in terms of their chromosomes," Love told HuffPost. "Those chromosomes are made up of A -- acimnata, the sweetness and the sugar -- or B -- balbisiana, the starch."

The ice cream banana (which is part of the ABB genomic group), as Love explained, is one part sugar and two parts starch. "In this case," he said, "the starch converts to sugar when they're fully ripe."

When they're very ripe and soft, Love likes to spread ice cream bananas over toast like butter. They also make a perfect ice cream alternative when frozen and blended.


These Magical Bananas Taste Exactly Like Ice Cream

While there are more than a thousand different types of bananas around the world, most of us, sadly, only know the Cavendish variety.

Cavendish bananas are hearty and can survive overseas shipping, but they are definitely not the most delicious. That title, for our money, belongs to ice cream bananas, which can be found easily in Hawaii, as well as other tropical environments in southeast Asia and central America.

Like its name suggests, the ice cream banana is sweet with undeniable hints of vanilla and its skin even appears frosted, starting out as a bluish-green color before it ripens.

At its most ripe stage, its texture is fluffier and creamier than the typical Chiquita you'll find at the store, and they practically melt in your mouth.

As sinful as they sound, ice cream bananas don't contain artificial sweeteners, flavors or additives. They're just born that way.

Ice cream bananas (also known as blue java bananas) may be a specialty fruit, but they aren't anything new. Farmers have been growing these sweet fruits in Hawaii since the early 1920s, according to Ken Love, executive director of Hawaii Tropical Fruit Growers, and in other tropical regions for ages.

"There are over 100 types of bananas in Hawaii, all tasting different," Love told The Huffington Post. "It's really the diversity that's interesting."

And ice cream bananas, Love adds, aren't even the sweetest variety.

As he explains on the website HawaiiFruit.net, banana plants mutate naturally, giving different bananas a variety of distinct flavors and characteristics such as apple bananas (which have hints of sweet citrus) and the Mysore banana (which tastes like berries, according to one Hawaii grower).

"Bananas are usually classified in terms of their chromosomes," Love told HuffPost. "Those chromosomes are made up of A -- acimnata, the sweetness and the sugar -- or B -- balbisiana, the starch."

The ice cream banana (which is part of the ABB genomic group), as Love explained, is one part sugar and two parts starch. "In this case," he said, "the starch converts to sugar when they're fully ripe."

When they're very ripe and soft, Love likes to spread ice cream bananas over toast like butter. They also make a perfect ice cream alternative when frozen and blended.


These Magical Bananas Taste Exactly Like Ice Cream

While there are more than a thousand different types of bananas around the world, most of us, sadly, only know the Cavendish variety.

Cavendish bananas are hearty and can survive overseas shipping, but they are definitely not the most delicious. That title, for our money, belongs to ice cream bananas, which can be found easily in Hawaii, as well as other tropical environments in southeast Asia and central America.

Like its name suggests, the ice cream banana is sweet with undeniable hints of vanilla and its skin even appears frosted, starting out as a bluish-green color before it ripens.

At its most ripe stage, its texture is fluffier and creamier than the typical Chiquita you'll find at the store, and they practically melt in your mouth.

As sinful as they sound, ice cream bananas don't contain artificial sweeteners, flavors or additives. They're just born that way.

Ice cream bananas (also known as blue java bananas) may be a specialty fruit, but they aren't anything new. Farmers have been growing these sweet fruits in Hawaii since the early 1920s, according to Ken Love, executive director of Hawaii Tropical Fruit Growers, and in other tropical regions for ages.

"There are over 100 types of bananas in Hawaii, all tasting different," Love told The Huffington Post. "It's really the diversity that's interesting."

And ice cream bananas, Love adds, aren't even the sweetest variety.

As he explains on the website HawaiiFruit.net, banana plants mutate naturally, giving different bananas a variety of distinct flavors and characteristics such as apple bananas (which have hints of sweet citrus) and the Mysore banana (which tastes like berries, according to one Hawaii grower).

"Bananas are usually classified in terms of their chromosomes," Love told HuffPost. "Those chromosomes are made up of A -- acimnata, the sweetness and the sugar -- or B -- balbisiana, the starch."

The ice cream banana (which is part of the ABB genomic group), as Love explained, is one part sugar and two parts starch. "In this case," he said, "the starch converts to sugar when they're fully ripe."

When they're very ripe and soft, Love likes to spread ice cream bananas over toast like butter. They also make a perfect ice cream alternative when frozen and blended.


These Magical Bananas Taste Exactly Like Ice Cream

While there are more than a thousand different types of bananas around the world, most of us, sadly, only know the Cavendish variety.

Cavendish bananas are hearty and can survive overseas shipping, but they are definitely not the most delicious. That title, for our money, belongs to ice cream bananas, which can be found easily in Hawaii, as well as other tropical environments in southeast Asia and central America.

Like its name suggests, the ice cream banana is sweet with undeniable hints of vanilla and its skin even appears frosted, starting out as a bluish-green color before it ripens.

At its most ripe stage, its texture is fluffier and creamier than the typical Chiquita you'll find at the store, and they practically melt in your mouth.

As sinful as they sound, ice cream bananas don't contain artificial sweeteners, flavors or additives. They're just born that way.

Ice cream bananas (also known as blue java bananas) may be a specialty fruit, but they aren't anything new. Farmers have been growing these sweet fruits in Hawaii since the early 1920s, according to Ken Love, executive director of Hawaii Tropical Fruit Growers, and in other tropical regions for ages.

"There are over 100 types of bananas in Hawaii, all tasting different," Love told The Huffington Post. "It's really the diversity that's interesting."

And ice cream bananas, Love adds, aren't even the sweetest variety.

As he explains on the website HawaiiFruit.net, banana plants mutate naturally, giving different bananas a variety of distinct flavors and characteristics such as apple bananas (which have hints of sweet citrus) and the Mysore banana (which tastes like berries, according to one Hawaii grower).

"Bananas are usually classified in terms of their chromosomes," Love told HuffPost. "Those chromosomes are made up of A -- acimnata, the sweetness and the sugar -- or B -- balbisiana, the starch."

The ice cream banana (which is part of the ABB genomic group), as Love explained, is one part sugar and two parts starch. "In this case," he said, "the starch converts to sugar when they're fully ripe."

When they're very ripe and soft, Love likes to spread ice cream bananas over toast like butter. They also make a perfect ice cream alternative when frozen and blended.



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