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Nutritionist Claims Curry Can Prevent Hair Loss

Nutritionist Claims Curry Can Prevent Hair Loss


A nutritionist is arguing curry spices prevent baldness

Wikimedia/Toshihiro Oimatsu

A nutritionist says the spices in curry encourage hair growth and prevent men from going bald.

Today in news that would be pretty darn awesome if it were true but probably is not, a nutritionist in Japan is arguing that a regular diet of curry encourages hair growth and prevents men from going bald.

According to The Local, nutritionist Yoshiko Nakagawa looked at data suggesting that India and Japan both have a very low percentage of male pattern baldness in their populations. Curries are also eaten very often in both India and Japan, so Nakagawa says it is likely that the curry is the source behind all those full heads of hair. She says that curry spices including turmeric, saffron, nutmeg, and spicy capsaicin increase blood circulation in the body, and the increased blood circulation thus makes people’s hair grow more.

Nakagawa’s assessment seems a bit far-fetched, but curry is still delicious. Check out some of our best curry recipes if you decide to give it a try.


How Much Protein You Need for Stronger, Healthier Hair

Most of your hair is made up of protein (with a little bit of fat and a few other components), specifically a protein called keratin. And the protein you get in your diet can help your hair grow and stay healthy, says Shani Francis, MD, MBA, medical director and chief wellness director of Ashira Dermatology.

That's because in order to grow, your hair needs the building blocks of protein, called amino acids. Your body can produce 11 of the 20 amino acids, but that means you have to get the remaining nine amino acids — called essential amino acids — from food.

If your diet is low in complete proteins, which contain all nine essential amino acids, you may experience hair loss, according to a January 2017 report published in Dermatology Practical & Conceptual. Biotin, a B vitamin found in protein you eat, helps metabolize amino acids and can support strong, healthy hair, Dr. Francis says (although you probably don't need biotin supplements unless you're deficient in it, according to March 2019 research published in Dermatology and Therapy).

One of your body's priorities when it comes to using protein, Dr. Francis says, is to support healthy muscle tissue. If your body isn't getting enough protein to maintain basic muscle function, your hair will suffer first, she says. "The body is using everything it can to keep going what's most important," she says.


How Much Protein You Need for Stronger, Healthier Hair

Most of your hair is made up of protein (with a little bit of fat and a few other components), specifically a protein called keratin. And the protein you get in your diet can help your hair grow and stay healthy, says Shani Francis, MD, MBA, medical director and chief wellness director of Ashira Dermatology.

That's because in order to grow, your hair needs the building blocks of protein, called amino acids. Your body can produce 11 of the 20 amino acids, but that means you have to get the remaining nine amino acids — called essential amino acids — from food.

If your diet is low in complete proteins, which contain all nine essential amino acids, you may experience hair loss, according to a January 2017 report published in Dermatology Practical & Conceptual. Biotin, a B vitamin found in protein you eat, helps metabolize amino acids and can support strong, healthy hair, Dr. Francis says (although you probably don't need biotin supplements unless you're deficient in it, according to March 2019 research published in Dermatology and Therapy).

One of your body's priorities when it comes to using protein, Dr. Francis says, is to support healthy muscle tissue. If your body isn't getting enough protein to maintain basic muscle function, your hair will suffer first, she says. "The body is using everything it can to keep going what's most important," she says.


How Much Protein You Need for Stronger, Healthier Hair

Most of your hair is made up of protein (with a little bit of fat and a few other components), specifically a protein called keratin. And the protein you get in your diet can help your hair grow and stay healthy, says Shani Francis, MD, MBA, medical director and chief wellness director of Ashira Dermatology.

That's because in order to grow, your hair needs the building blocks of protein, called amino acids. Your body can produce 11 of the 20 amino acids, but that means you have to get the remaining nine amino acids — called essential amino acids — from food.

If your diet is low in complete proteins, which contain all nine essential amino acids, you may experience hair loss, according to a January 2017 report published in Dermatology Practical & Conceptual. Biotin, a B vitamin found in protein you eat, helps metabolize amino acids and can support strong, healthy hair, Dr. Francis says (although you probably don't need biotin supplements unless you're deficient in it, according to March 2019 research published in Dermatology and Therapy).

One of your body's priorities when it comes to using protein, Dr. Francis says, is to support healthy muscle tissue. If your body isn't getting enough protein to maintain basic muscle function, your hair will suffer first, she says. "The body is using everything it can to keep going what's most important," she says.


How Much Protein You Need for Stronger, Healthier Hair

Most of your hair is made up of protein (with a little bit of fat and a few other components), specifically a protein called keratin. And the protein you get in your diet can help your hair grow and stay healthy, says Shani Francis, MD, MBA, medical director and chief wellness director of Ashira Dermatology.

That's because in order to grow, your hair needs the building blocks of protein, called amino acids. Your body can produce 11 of the 20 amino acids, but that means you have to get the remaining nine amino acids — called essential amino acids — from food.

If your diet is low in complete proteins, which contain all nine essential amino acids, you may experience hair loss, according to a January 2017 report published in Dermatology Practical & Conceptual. Biotin, a B vitamin found in protein you eat, helps metabolize amino acids and can support strong, healthy hair, Dr. Francis says (although you probably don't need biotin supplements unless you're deficient in it, according to March 2019 research published in Dermatology and Therapy).

One of your body's priorities when it comes to using protein, Dr. Francis says, is to support healthy muscle tissue. If your body isn't getting enough protein to maintain basic muscle function, your hair will suffer first, she says. "The body is using everything it can to keep going what's most important," she says.


How Much Protein You Need for Stronger, Healthier Hair

Most of your hair is made up of protein (with a little bit of fat and a few other components), specifically a protein called keratin. And the protein you get in your diet can help your hair grow and stay healthy, says Shani Francis, MD, MBA, medical director and chief wellness director of Ashira Dermatology.

That's because in order to grow, your hair needs the building blocks of protein, called amino acids. Your body can produce 11 of the 20 amino acids, but that means you have to get the remaining nine amino acids — called essential amino acids — from food.

If your diet is low in complete proteins, which contain all nine essential amino acids, you may experience hair loss, according to a January 2017 report published in Dermatology Practical & Conceptual. Biotin, a B vitamin found in protein you eat, helps metabolize amino acids and can support strong, healthy hair, Dr. Francis says (although you probably don't need biotin supplements unless you're deficient in it, according to March 2019 research published in Dermatology and Therapy).

One of your body's priorities when it comes to using protein, Dr. Francis says, is to support healthy muscle tissue. If your body isn't getting enough protein to maintain basic muscle function, your hair will suffer first, she says. "The body is using everything it can to keep going what's most important," she says.


How Much Protein You Need for Stronger, Healthier Hair

Most of your hair is made up of protein (with a little bit of fat and a few other components), specifically a protein called keratin. And the protein you get in your diet can help your hair grow and stay healthy, says Shani Francis, MD, MBA, medical director and chief wellness director of Ashira Dermatology.

That's because in order to grow, your hair needs the building blocks of protein, called amino acids. Your body can produce 11 of the 20 amino acids, but that means you have to get the remaining nine amino acids — called essential amino acids — from food.

If your diet is low in complete proteins, which contain all nine essential amino acids, you may experience hair loss, according to a January 2017 report published in Dermatology Practical & Conceptual. Biotin, a B vitamin found in protein you eat, helps metabolize amino acids and can support strong, healthy hair, Dr. Francis says (although you probably don't need biotin supplements unless you're deficient in it, according to March 2019 research published in Dermatology and Therapy).

One of your body's priorities when it comes to using protein, Dr. Francis says, is to support healthy muscle tissue. If your body isn't getting enough protein to maintain basic muscle function, your hair will suffer first, she says. "The body is using everything it can to keep going what's most important," she says.


How Much Protein You Need for Stronger, Healthier Hair

Most of your hair is made up of protein (with a little bit of fat and a few other components), specifically a protein called keratin. And the protein you get in your diet can help your hair grow and stay healthy, says Shani Francis, MD, MBA, medical director and chief wellness director of Ashira Dermatology.

That's because in order to grow, your hair needs the building blocks of protein, called amino acids. Your body can produce 11 of the 20 amino acids, but that means you have to get the remaining nine amino acids — called essential amino acids — from food.

If your diet is low in complete proteins, which contain all nine essential amino acids, you may experience hair loss, according to a January 2017 report published in Dermatology Practical & Conceptual. Biotin, a B vitamin found in protein you eat, helps metabolize amino acids and can support strong, healthy hair, Dr. Francis says (although you probably don't need biotin supplements unless you're deficient in it, according to March 2019 research published in Dermatology and Therapy).

One of your body's priorities when it comes to using protein, Dr. Francis says, is to support healthy muscle tissue. If your body isn't getting enough protein to maintain basic muscle function, your hair will suffer first, she says. "The body is using everything it can to keep going what's most important," she says.


How Much Protein You Need for Stronger, Healthier Hair

Most of your hair is made up of protein (with a little bit of fat and a few other components), specifically a protein called keratin. And the protein you get in your diet can help your hair grow and stay healthy, says Shani Francis, MD, MBA, medical director and chief wellness director of Ashira Dermatology.

That's because in order to grow, your hair needs the building blocks of protein, called amino acids. Your body can produce 11 of the 20 amino acids, but that means you have to get the remaining nine amino acids — called essential amino acids — from food.

If your diet is low in complete proteins, which contain all nine essential amino acids, you may experience hair loss, according to a January 2017 report published in Dermatology Practical & Conceptual. Biotin, a B vitamin found in protein you eat, helps metabolize amino acids and can support strong, healthy hair, Dr. Francis says (although you probably don't need biotin supplements unless you're deficient in it, according to March 2019 research published in Dermatology and Therapy).

One of your body's priorities when it comes to using protein, Dr. Francis says, is to support healthy muscle tissue. If your body isn't getting enough protein to maintain basic muscle function, your hair will suffer first, she says. "The body is using everything it can to keep going what's most important," she says.


How Much Protein You Need for Stronger, Healthier Hair

Most of your hair is made up of protein (with a little bit of fat and a few other components), specifically a protein called keratin. And the protein you get in your diet can help your hair grow and stay healthy, says Shani Francis, MD, MBA, medical director and chief wellness director of Ashira Dermatology.

That's because in order to grow, your hair needs the building blocks of protein, called amino acids. Your body can produce 11 of the 20 amino acids, but that means you have to get the remaining nine amino acids — called essential amino acids — from food.

If your diet is low in complete proteins, which contain all nine essential amino acids, you may experience hair loss, according to a January 2017 report published in Dermatology Practical & Conceptual. Biotin, a B vitamin found in protein you eat, helps metabolize amino acids and can support strong, healthy hair, Dr. Francis says (although you probably don't need biotin supplements unless you're deficient in it, according to March 2019 research published in Dermatology and Therapy).

One of your body's priorities when it comes to using protein, Dr. Francis says, is to support healthy muscle tissue. If your body isn't getting enough protein to maintain basic muscle function, your hair will suffer first, she says. "The body is using everything it can to keep going what's most important," she says.


How Much Protein You Need for Stronger, Healthier Hair

Most of your hair is made up of protein (with a little bit of fat and a few other components), specifically a protein called keratin. And the protein you get in your diet can help your hair grow and stay healthy, says Shani Francis, MD, MBA, medical director and chief wellness director of Ashira Dermatology.

That's because in order to grow, your hair needs the building blocks of protein, called amino acids. Your body can produce 11 of the 20 amino acids, but that means you have to get the remaining nine amino acids — called essential amino acids — from food.

If your diet is low in complete proteins, which contain all nine essential amino acids, you may experience hair loss, according to a January 2017 report published in Dermatology Practical & Conceptual. Biotin, a B vitamin found in protein you eat, helps metabolize amino acids and can support strong, healthy hair, Dr. Francis says (although you probably don't need biotin supplements unless you're deficient in it, according to March 2019 research published in Dermatology and Therapy).

One of your body's priorities when it comes to using protein, Dr. Francis says, is to support healthy muscle tissue. If your body isn't getting enough protein to maintain basic muscle function, your hair will suffer first, she says. "The body is using everything it can to keep going what's most important," she says.


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